Jan 30 2018

Category: Blogcreekside @ 10:21 am
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Feb 19 2018

Fire-Rated Frames

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Q: I’m confused… does the door frame in a fire door have to be labeled, when 100% sprinkled with 1-hour fire-rated assemblies are in place with a 45-minute labeled door ?

A: First of all… the building being sprinklered has no bearing on this issue.

Secondly, yes, the frame must be labeled as a fire-rated frame when the door assembly is a fire-rated door assembly. In other words, if the door itself is a labeled fire-rated door, then the frame also must be labeled.

Now, most fire-rated frames are identified with a label that says the frame is fire-rated… it will not say the frame is a 45-minute frame or a 90-minute frame. There are some exceptions to this, but most frames are not labeled with a fire-rating in minutes or hours… they are just labeled as fire-rated frames.

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Feb 16 2018

Different Construction Types

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Q: What is the allowed distance a non-sprinkled stick built building can be located beside a hospital?

A: Your question encompasses a couple of different issues. When you say “stick-built” building, I think of wood frame construction, which is Construction Type V (000) in accordance with the Life Safety Code and NFPA 220. Construction Type V (000) is not permitted in healthcare occupancies unless the hospital is only one story and is fully sprinklered.

So, let’s assume your hospital is more than one story and is at least Construction Type II (222), which is non-combustible construction with beams, columns, joists and floors fire rated at 2-hours. If you have an adjoining wood-frame building with Construction Type V (000), then it must be separated from the healthcare occupancy with a 2-hour fire rated barrier.

However, there is a caveat with this requirement. If the wood-frame construction building is separated by a minimum of 10 feet, and is not-connected to the building containing the healthcare occupancy, then a 2-hour fire rated barrier is not required. This 10-foot gap would act as a fire barrier is one building were to catch on fire.

This 10-foot gap is an interpretation based on section 7.2.2.5.2.1 that requires 10-feet of the horizontal exterior of the building wall to be fire-rated where unprotected exterior walls of a stairwell connect to the building at an angle less than 180 degrees.

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Feb 15 2018

Strange Observations – Part 13

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Continuing in a series of strange things that I have seen when consulting at hospitals…

Believe it or not, there is a fire extinguisher buried behind all of the trash on the carts.

If a fire were to occur, how fast would the staff be able to find the extinguisher?


Feb 14 2018

Toaster Ovens

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Q: Are toaster ovens with a grounded third prong plug acceptable in a hospital staff lounge? The plug should allow for any short-circuit.

A: Actually, according to section 19.3.2.5.2 of the 2012 Life Safety Code, I believe toaster ovens are permitted in hospital staff lounges, that are separated from the corridor. The Annex section of 19.3.2.5.2 says it is intended to permit small appliances for reheating, such as microwave ovens and toasters to be exempt from the requirements for commercial cooking equipment and hazardous area protection. But the problem with toaster ovens, is it is a perceived risk by many authorities, because one can set the toaster oven to 450 degrees and it will stay on indefinitely creating a heat source, unlike microwave ovens and even toasters that automatically turn off. So, authorities often ask the hospital if they have a risk assessment or a policy on the proper use of toaster ovens since it is a perceived risk. I think requiring the hospital to have a risk assessment or a policy on the proper use of perceived risk such as a toaster oven is a valid concern.

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Feb 13 2018

Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp – April 24 & 25, 2018

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Understand practical applications of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®! Learn from Life Safety surveyors on what to prepare for during surveys! A 2-day Boot Camp on the comprehensive examination of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®, as it applies to healthcare organizations; presented by Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC and Codenity, LLC.

Date: April 24 & 25, 2018

Location: Embassy Suites Centennial Olympic Park, 267 Marietta St., Atlanta, GA 30313  404-223-2300

Topics:
• LSC Origins & Organization • Smoke Compartments • Occupancy Designations
• Suites • Construction Types • Additions & Renovations
• Operating Features • Means of Egress • Door Locks
• Ambulatory Surgical Centers • Fire Barriers • Hazardous Areas
• Building Services • Fire Protection Systems • Understanding CMS
• Challenges in Implementing the New Requirements of the 2012 LSC • Key Interpretations by Accreditation Organizations • Documentation Needed for a Successful Survey

Who Should Attend:
• Facility Managers • Safety Officers • Chief Operating Officers
• Accreditation Coordinators • Architect/Engineers • Consultants

Presenters:
Brad Keyes, CHSP, owner of Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC; and former Joint Commission LS surveyor.

Alise Howlett, Assoc. AIA, CFPE, CHFM, owner of Codenity, LLC; current advisor to HFAP, and a plan reviewer for multiple municipalities.

Cost: $889.00 per participant. Includes workbook, seminar materials, opening night reception, and breakfast and lunch each day; Does not include hotel, or travel. Certificate of Attendance awarded on completion.

Embassy Suites at Centennial Olympic Park, 267 Marietta Street, Atlanta, GA 30313, phone (404) 223-2300

To receive special event hotel room pricing of $179/night, book your room prior to March 24 at: http://embassysuites.hilton.com/en/es/groups/personalized/A/ATLESES-KLS-20180423/index.jhtml

Register Early: Seating is limited to 50 individuals – Previous boot camps have sold out.  Registration will close on April 2. Go to https://www.eventbrite.com and search “Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp-Atlanta”

Registration is not confirmed until payment is received. Registration closes when all seats are filled, or April 2, 2018

Bring your own copy of the 2012 Life Safety Code!

Questions? Call Alise Howlett at 815-713-8144

Exclusively sponsored by:

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Feb 12 2018

Operating Room Fire Drills

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Q: Back in March 2016, you answered a reader’s question that fire drills are not specifically required for operating rooms. While reviewing NFPA 99-2012, I came across a section that states that fire exit drills must be conducted annually or more frequently as determined by the applicable building code, Life Safety Code, or fire code. Does this mean we must conduct fire drills in each of our operating suites every year?

A: Your observations are excellent. Back in March, 2016, there were no requirements to conduct a fire drill in Surgery. Now, after CMS adopted the 2012 edition of NFPA 99, there is. As you pointed out, section 15.13.3.10.3 of NFPA 99-2012, does require an annual fire drill for the operating room and surgical suite personnel.

However, the code does not say a fire drill has to be conducted in each operating room. The purpose of a fire drill in surgery is to provide education and training for staff. Therefore, my suggestion is to schedule the annual fire drill when there are no scheduled surgeries, and as many staff as possible can attend. You begin by conducting an education session on what the expectations are if a fire was discovered in the operating room. You can have different scenarios as the circumstances dictate. Then conduct a drill to see if the staff performs satisfactorily. If you have lots of staff, then utilize multiple operating rooms, and have multiple observers.

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Feb 09 2018

Elevator Recall Test

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Q: How do I perform the elevator recall test?

A: If you have never performed an elevator recall test, I suggest you have your elevator maintenance company show you how it is done the first time, then you can continue to do it on a monthly test. But, in lieu of that, here is how a monthly elevator recall test is performed:

  1. Take a copy of the elevator recall key, insert it in the corridor keyed switch on the level best used by the responding fire department, and turn it to the “Test” position. This key should be available from the elevator service company.
  2. This will recall all the elevators in that bank to the floor that you are on. The elevator will ‘recall’ to that floor and open the doors. The controls inside the elevator will not respond and the elevator car will sit there waiting for someone to take control. The elevators will be “out of service” during this test, so plan on doing this test when it will least impact your operations.
  3. Remove the key from the recall corridor switch (leave the switch still in the “Test” position) and enter one of the elevator cars. Take the key and insert it in the keyed switched labeled “Fire Fighter Service”, and turn it to the “Test” position (It should say “Test”, but if not, turn the switch anyway). Now you have manual control on the elevator buttons inside the car.
  4. Push a button to another floor, holding it until the doors closed. The elevator will travel to that floor, but the doors will not open. If you push the “Door Open” button, then the doors will open, and stay that way until another floor button is pressed.
  5. While in the elevator car, test the function of the emergency telephone in the car.
  6. Return the elevator car to the recall floor, and test any other cars in that bank. Remove the key and go back to the corridor switch and return the switch to the normal setting.

That is a monthly recall test, which must be done each month to all elevators. You may find that the fire alarm system will become alerted during this test and before the elevators return to normal service you may have to reset the fire alarm system.

But check with your sate and local AHJs before conducting this test for the first time… There are some states that will only allow certified elevator technicians to perform this test.

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Feb 08 2018

Strange Observations – Part 12

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Continuing in a series of strange things that I have seen when consulting at hospitals…

Boxes and supplies blocking a door, preventing it from closing.

Don’t know what the circumstances were in this situation, but it will likely get the hospital in trouble.


Feb 07 2018

Obstructions to Fire Extinguishers & Med Gas Valves

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Q: Can a patient bed or gurney be left in front of a fire extinguisher or a medical gas shutoff valve in a procedural area, such as an operating room, or a Cath lab? This would only be during the procedure. Wouldn’t the bed be considered ‘in use’?

A: Regardless if the bed is considered in use or not, you are not permitted to block access to a fire extinguisher or a med gas shutoff valve. NFPA 10-2010, section 6.1.3.1 is very clear that access to fire extinguishers cannot be obstructed. And NFPA 99-2012, section 5.1.4.8.4 is also very clear that you cannot obstruct access to medical gas shutoff valves. Even a short-term temporary obstruction to either of these is not permitted. It is best to find a place out of the way for the beds and gurneys that do not obstruct access to these critical items.


Feb 06 2018

Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp – April 24 & 25, 2018

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Understand practical applications of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®! Learn from Life Safety surveyors on what to prepare for during surveys! A 2-day Boot Camp on the comprehensive examination of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®, as it applies to healthcare organizations; presented by Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC and Codenity, LLC.

Date: April 24 & 25, 2018

Location: Embassy Suites Centennial Olympic Park, 267 Marietta St., Atlanta, GA 30313  404-223-2300

Topics:
• LSC Origins & Organization • Smoke Compartments • Occupancy Designations
• Suites • Construction Types • Additions & Renovations
• Operating Features • Means of Egress • Door Locks
• Ambulatory Surgical Centers • Fire Barriers • Hazardous Areas
• Building Services • Fire Protection Systems • Understanding CMS
• Challenges in Implementing the New Requirements of the 2012 LSC • Key Interpretations by Accreditation Organizations • Documentation Needed for a Successful Survey

Who Should Attend:
• Facility Managers • Safety Officers • Chief Operating Officers
• Accreditation Coordinators • Architect/Engineers • Consultants

Presenters:
Brad Keyes, CHSP, owner of Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC; and former Joint Commission LS surveyor.

Alise Howlett, Assoc. AIA, CFPE, CHFM, owner of Codenity, LLC; current advisor to HFAP, and a plan reviewer for multiple municipalities.

Cost: $889.00 per participant. Includes workbook, seminar materials, opening night reception, and breakfast and lunch each day; Does not include hotel, or travel. Certificate of Attendance awarded on completion.

Embassy Suites at Centennial Olympic Park, 267 Marietta Street, Atlanta, GA 30313, phone (404) 223-2300

To receive special event hotel room pricing of $179/night, book your room prior to March 24 at: http://embassysuites.hilton.com/en/es/groups/personalized/A/ATLESES-KLS-20180423/index.jhtml

Register Early: Seating is limited to 50 individuals – Previous boot camps have sold out.  Registration will close on April 2. Go to https://www.eventbrite.com and search “Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp-Atlanta”

Registration is not confirmed until payment is received. Registration closes when all seats are filled, or April 2, 2018

Bring your own copy of the 2012 Life Safety Code!

Questions? Call Alise Howlett at 815-713-8144

Exclusively sponsored by:

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