Wood-Frame Addition

Q: Years ago, our state health department approved an addition to a hospital that I supervise. The addition is wood framed, not sprinkler protected, and does not have the required 2-hour fire barrier separation (yes, I’m serious). Recently, sprayed-on fire proofing began to fall from the deck. After consultation, we’ve decided the best course of action is to add complete sprinkler protection to this area. This is a costly project and will take time for approval. What are your thoughts on implementing some sort of ILSM? There is no egress blocked, or obstructed, but this is an area where there are MRI machines and I believe the wood framing with no sprinkler and fire proofing issues can be a serious concern.

A: Wow… that is a serious problem. You did not say what your Construction Type is. Since it involves wood-frame, it has to be one of the following:

  • Type III (211) with sprinklers
  • Type IV (2HH) with sprinklers
  • Type V (111) with sprinklers

But you say it does not have any sprinklers? Yeah… that’s serious problem. And there is no 2-hour fire-rated vertically aligned barrier to separate this non-compliant construction type from the rest of the hospital? That means the rest of the hospital is also now non-compliant.

You absolutely need to assess this issue for ILSMs and document your assessment. The whole hospital is now out of compliance with the Life Safety Code regarding Construction Type (see Table 18.1.6.1 of the 2012 Life Safety Code). When there is no proper 2-hour fire rated vertically aligned barrier separating different construction types, then the lesser construction type prevails, and the rest of the hospital is not permitted to have this type of construction type.

You need to get professional help. Contact your architect, or a different architect if the one you currently use got you into this pickle. Discuss this with your CEO and tell him/her that you have three serious issues that will require funds:

  • Reapply the failing fire-proofing
  • Install sprinklers in the addition
  • Create a 2-hour vertically aligned barrier to separate the different construction types.

Develop a plan and time-line to implement all of these changes and improvements, but you need to discuss this with your architect, and before you do any construction, you need to submit a plan to the state and local authorities for their review.

Please understand that if you fail to resolve these issues, your next survey could end up being a Conditional Level Finding, based on the seriousness of the deficiencies.

Brad Keyes
Brad Keyes, CHSP

Brad is a former advisor to Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) and former Joint Commission LS surveyor. He guides clients through  organizational assessment; management training; ongoing coaching of task groups; and extensive one-on-one coaching of facility leaders. He analyzes and develops leadership effectiveness and efficiency in work processes, focusing on assessing an organization’s preparedness for a survey, evaluating processes in achieving preparedness, and guiding organizations toward compliance. 

As a presenter at national seminars, regional conferences, and audio conferences, Brad teaches the Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp series to various groups and organizations. He is the author or co-author of many HCPro books, including the best-selling  Analyzing the Hospital Life Safety Survey, now in its 3rd edition. Brad has also authored a variety of articles in numerous publications addressing features of life safety and fire protection, as well as white papers and articles on the Building Maintenance Program. Currently serving as the contributing editor of the monthly HCPro newsletter Healthcare Life Safety Compliance  gives Brad further insight into the industry’s trends and best practices.