Strange Observations – Sprinkler Pipe Suspended From Ductwork

Continuing in a series of strange things that I have seen while consulting at hospitals…

Some organizations fail to install sprinklers underneath the ductwork that is 48-inches wide or wider. This facility did not forget, but the sprinkler-fitter who installed this pipe for the sprinkler head attached it to the ductwork, which is not permitted.

The sprinkler pipe can only be suspended from the building itself (i.e. structural beams, joists, etc.), and not from anything else.

There is one exception to that rule… Sprinkler pipe may be suspended from a hanger that also supports ductwork, provided the hanger is designed to support the weight of the duct, the pipe, the water in the pipe, and an additional 250 lbs. (see NFPA 13-2010, 9.2.1.5). If you ever see sprinkler pipe suspended from the same hanger that supports ductwork, ask the installer to provide documentation that the hanger can support that weight.

Brad Keyes
Brad Keyes, CHSP

Brad is a former advisor to Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) and former Joint Commission LS surveyor. He guides clients through  organizational assessment; management training; ongoing coaching of task groups; and extensive one-on-one coaching of facility leaders. He analyzes and develops leadership effectiveness and efficiency in work processes, focusing on assessing an organization’s preparedness for a survey, evaluating processes in achieving preparedness, and guiding organizations toward compliance. 

As a presenter at national seminars, regional conferences, and audio conferences, Brad teaches the Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp series to various groups and organizations. He is the author or co-author of many HCPro books, including the best-selling  Analyzing the Hospital Life Safety Survey, now in its 3rd edition. Brad has also authored a variety of articles in numerous publications addressing features of life safety and fire protection, as well as white papers and articles on the Building Maintenance Program. Currently serving as the contributing editor of the monthly HCPro newsletter Healthcare Life Safety Compliance  gives Brad further insight into the industry’s trends and best practices.