Risk Assessments

Q: In regards to risk assessments, would you base a risk level to include having any additional controls in place for each item assessed, or do you place the risk level on the impact to patients/staff assuming the item being assessed would not be available or functional? We are performing a risk assessment on facility systems and medical equipment and are wondering what the standard is in the approach.

A: It sounds like you’re referring to the NFPA 99-2012 risk assessment for building system categories. If so, then the assessment is conducted with the assumption of the worst-case scenario, whereby the systems being evaluated fail and back-up systems (i.e. emergency power generators) fail as well. According to section A.4.1 of NFPA 99-2012, the category definitions apply to equipment operations and are not intended to consider intervention by caregivers or others. Also, the Introduction to Chapter 4 in the NFPA 99-2012 Handbook, the authors say:

“Each system must be evaluated for its impact on both the patients and the caregivers if the system should fail. Based on the worst-outcome scenario of a failure’s impact, the system is assigned a category. The chapter on that system the describes the requirements for the selected category.”

Be aware that the chairman of the Technical Committee who wrote this new chapter 4 for NFPA 99-2012 told me the intent was for the risk assessment to be on new equipment only, and existing equipment was exempted. However, chapter 4 of NFPA 99-2012 does not say that, and CMS is requiring all certified hospitals to have this risk assessment conducted on existing equipment as well as new. So, I recommend to my clients to do the assessment (it only takes a few minutes) on all existing and new equipment until such time CMS changes their minds.

Brad Keyes
Brad Keyes, CHSP

Brad is a former advisor to Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) and former Joint Commission LS surveyor. He guides clients through  organizational assessment; management training; ongoing coaching of task groups; and extensive one-on-one coaching of facility leaders. He analyzes and develops leadership effectiveness and efficiency in work processes, focusing on assessing an organization’s preparedness for a survey, evaluating processes in achieving preparedness, and guiding organizations toward compliance. 

As a presenter at national seminars, regional conferences, and audio conferences, Brad teaches the Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp series to various groups and organizations. He is the author or co-author of many HCPro books, including the best-selling  Analyzing the Hospital Life Safety Survey, now in its 3rd edition. Brad has also authored a variety of articles in numerous publications addressing features of life safety and fire protection, as well as white papers and articles on the Building Maintenance Program. Currently serving as the contributing editor of the monthly HCPro newsletter Healthcare Life Safety Compliance  gives Brad further insight into the industry’s trends and best practices.