Risk Assessments

Q: In regards to risk assessments, would you base a risk level to include having any additional controls in place for each item assessed, or do you place the risk level on the impact to patients/staff assuming the item being assessed would not be available or functional? We are performing a risk assessment on facility systems and medical equipment and are wondering what the standard is in the approach.

A: It sounds like you’re referring to the NFPA 99-2012 risk assessment for building system categories. If so, then the assessment is conducted with the assumption of the worst-case scenario, whereby the systems being evaluated fail and back-up systems (i.e. emergency power generators) fail as well. According to section A.4.1 of NFPA 99-2012, the category definitions apply to equipment operations and are not intended to consider intervention by caregivers or others. Also, the Introduction to Chapter 4 in the NFPA 99-2012 Handbook, the authors say:

“Each system must be evaluated for its impact on both the patients and the caregivers if the system should fail. Based on the worst-outcome scenario of a failure’s impact, the system is assigned a category. The chapter on that system the describes the requirements for the selected category.”

Be aware that the chairman of the Technical Committee who wrote this new chapter 4 for NFPA 99-2012 told me the intent was for the risk assessment to be on new equipment only, and existing equipment was exempted. However, chapter 4 of NFPA 99-2012 does not say that, and CMS is requiring all certified hospitals to have this risk assessment conducted on existing equipment as well as new. So, I recommend to my clients to do the assessment (it only takes a few minutes) on all existing and new equipment until such time CMS changes their minds.