Office Door Holiday Decorations

Q: Staff members at our behavioral healthcare facility enjoy decorating their corridor office doors (business occupancy, 20-minute fire-rated doors, multiple floors) with wrapping paper, bows, etc. affixed with scotch tape for the holidays. Are there specific prohibitions against this? We don’t want to be a Grinch unless necessary. thanks!

A: Section 7.1.10.2.1 of the 2012 LSC says decorations cannot obstruct the function of the door or the visibility of the egress components. So, the decorations cannot obstruct the door in any way.

Section 4.1.4.1 of NFPA 80-2010 says signage on fire-rated doors cannot be more than 5% of the door surface. Now decorations may not be considered signage by most individuals, but the intent is to keep the fire-load on the door to a minimum so it can function properly in the event of a fire. I can see where a surveyor would have a serious issue with decorating fire-rated doors with wrapping paper and bows, because it adds fuel to the door that was not present during the UL testing of the doors.

Sorry, but I suggest you be the Grinch and tell them to remove wrapping paper and bows from the fire-rated doors.

Brad Keyes
Brad Keyes, CHSP

Brad is a former advisor to Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) and former Joint Commission LS surveyor. He guides clients through  organizational assessment; management training; ongoing coaching of task groups; and extensive one-on-one coaching of facility leaders. He analyzes and develops leadership effectiveness and efficiency in work processes, focusing on assessing an organization’s preparedness for a survey, evaluating processes in achieving preparedness, and guiding organizations toward compliance. 

As a presenter at national seminars, regional conferences, and audio conferences, Brad teaches the Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp series to various groups and organizations. He is the author or co-author of many HCPro books, including the best-selling  Analyzing the Hospital Life Safety Survey, now in its 3rd edition. Brad has also authored a variety of articles in numerous publications addressing features of life safety and fire protection, as well as white papers and articles on the Building Maintenance Program. Currently serving as the contributing editor of the monthly HCPro newsletter Healthcare Life Safety Compliance  gives Brad further insight into the industry’s trends and best practices.