Lower Bottom Rod Latching

Q: My question is regarding a 2-hour fire-rated wall that is separating our physical therapy department and the main hospital. In between the two is a long glass hallway with a dual egress 90-minute fire-rated door. The doors are top latching. I have had an environment of care consultant say that the door has to be top and bottom latching. Their reasoning is because it separates two occupancies. But both occupancies are owned by the hospital, and are not separate entities. Does the dual egress door have to be top and bottom latching?

A: Maybe yes and maybe no… The requirement for a lower bottom rod is dependent on the door assembly manufacturer’s UL listing when they had the door tested. It is not a NFPA standard that all doors have to have a lower bottom rod, but rather it is driven by the manufacturer’s hardware listing from UL.

I have not seen the door assembly but your consultant has. If there is evidence that the lower bottom rod on the fire-rated door assembly was originally installed and now it has been removed, then yes you need to re-install it and have a top and bottom latching connection. This is not uncommon after a few years when the lower bottom rod becomes damaged, and the hospital maintenance just removes it since it latches at the top. If that is the situation for you, then that would be a non-compliant situation.

In some cases, the door manufacturer provides a ‘Fire Pin’ in lieu of the lower bottom rod, which is spring-activated to shoot a pin horizontally from one leaf to the other to hold the door closed during a fire. These ‘Fire Pins’ do not operate until the temperature at the floor reaches 450°F or thereabouts, so there is no chance of the pin activating prior to anyone wanting to use the doors.

Then I’ve been told there are a few door manufacturer’s that have passed the UL testing whereby they are only required to have a latching device at the top of the door, and not at the bottom of the door. I’ve never seen one, but I’ve been told they are out there.

I suggest you contact the distributer of the door in question and ask them what hardware is required in order to maintain the fire-rating from UL. Then maintain that documentation for future reference during a survey.