GFCI Receptacles on Ice Machines

Q: We had our Joint Commission inspection today and they cited us for water coolers and ice machines not being plugged into GFCI (ground-fault circuit interrupter) receptacles. One of our buildings was built in 1972 and the other was 2008. They cited NFPA 99-2012 Chapters 6 and 9, under EC 02.05.05 EP 8. Do you believe that was a correct finding? Thanks

A: Yes… that is a legitimate finding.

NFPA 99-2012, section 6.3.2.1 says the electrical installation must be in accordance with NFPA 70 National Electrical Code. Article 210.8(B) of NFPA 70-2011 says ground-fault circuit-interruption for personnel protection shall be provided as required in 210.8(A) through (C). The ground-fault circuit-interrupter shall be installed in a readily accessible location.

Sub-section (B) “Other Than Dwelling Units” says all 125-volt, single-phase, 15- and 20-ampere receptacles installed in the locations specified in 210.8(B)(1) through (8) shall have ground-fault circuit-interrupter protection for personnel:

(1) Bathrooms

(2) Kitchens

(3) Rooftops

(4) Outdoors

(5) Sinks — where receptacles are installed within 6 ft of the outside edge of the sink.

(6) Indoor wet locations

(7) Locker rooms with associated showering facilities

(8) Garages, service bays, and similar areas where electrical diagnostic equipment, electrical hand tools, or portable lighting equipment are to be used

So, item #6 ‘wet locations’ is the kicker on this issue. The AHJs are now interpreting anything that holds water to be a wet location, and therefore must have a GFCI receptacle. Another issue that you need to be aware of, is all GFCI receptacles need to be tested monthly. Ouch. More labor and documentation.

I don’t see where NFPA 99-2012 Chapter 9 (HVAC) applies in this issue, but it is a legitimate finding through chapter 6.

Brad Keyes
Brad Keyes, CHSP

Brad is a former advisor to Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) and former Joint Commission LS surveyor. He guides clients through  organizational assessment; management training; ongoing coaching of task groups; and extensive one-on-one coaching of facility leaders. He analyzes and develops leadership effectiveness and efficiency in work processes, focusing on assessing an organization’s preparedness for a survey, evaluating processes in achieving preparedness, and guiding organizations toward compliance. 

As a presenter at national seminars, regional conferences, and audio conferences, Brad teaches the Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp series to various groups and organizations. He is the author or co-author of many HCPro books, including the best-selling  Analyzing the Hospital Life Safety Survey, now in its 3rd edition. Brad has also authored a variety of articles in numerous publications addressing features of life safety and fire protection, as well as white papers and articles on the Building Maintenance Program. Currently serving as the contributing editor of the monthly HCPro newsletter Healthcare Life Safety Compliance  gives Brad further insight into the industry’s trends and best practices.