Fire Drills in the Behavioral Health Unit

Q: I work at a hospital that has just partnered with a Behavioral Health organization. We have renovated a floor and will be opening up soon. My question is this: For fire drills in the main hospital, I am sure it would be best to separate these activities from the Behavioral Health unit. And I am sure we would need to be notified on our panel if an event happened on the unit. Am I on the right track? Is there any code that speaks to this? In addition, what would be your suggestions in regard to stairwell egress in the case of an alarm on the Behavioral Health unit. Delayed egress? Clinical needs locks?

 A: Okay… so there is a lot to cover here. As I understand your question, you will soon be opening a behavioral health unit in an existing acute-care hospital. You say you are partnering with another organization… does this mean the behavioral health unit is a separate entity (i.e. does it have a separate CMS certification number) from the acute-care hospital?

 If the behavioral health unit is a separate entity, then you must conduct separate fire drills (once per shift per quarter) in the behavioral health unit as compared to the rest of the acute-care hospital. If the behavioral health unit is not a separate entity, then you are not required to conduct separate fire drills from the rest of the acute-care hospital. So, you need to verify if the behavioral health unit will be a separate entity from the acute-care hospital.  

The fire alarm control system is a system for the entire building, even if there are separate entities inside the building. If a fire alarm originated on the behavioral health unit, you most definitely need to know about it in the acute-care hospital, and vice-versa.

The behavioral health unit would likely qualify for clinical needs locks as described in 18.2.2.2.5.1 of the 2012 LSC. These locks are not required to automatically unlock on activation of the fire alarm system. You can do that if you want, but there is no requirement to do so. Actually, you really don’t want the locks on the doors in the behavioral health unit to automatically unlock on a fire alarm, because patients will soon figure that out and will loiter around the locked egress doors and jump at the chance to elope whenever a fire alarm actuates. I do not suggest delayed egress locks, but rather clinical needs locks as long as you qualify for them.