Daisy Chain

Q: What would be the appropriate standard for a daisy chain?

A: I’m not entirely sure of what you are asking…. But when you say “What would be the appropriate standard for a daisy chain” I’m assuming you are referring to an extension cord (or power strip) plugged into another extension cord (or power strip). The Code trail that would prohibit that, is:

2012 Life Safety Code, section 19.5.1.1 requires compliance with section 9.1 for utilities. Section 9.1.2 requires compliance with NFPA 70-2011 on all issues of electrical wiring and equipment. NFPA 70-2011, Article 400.8 (1) says: “…flexible cords and cables shall not be used …as a substitute for the fixed wiring of a structure”. So NFPA 70-2011, Article 400.8 (1) prohibits daisy chains, because the first extension cord (or power strip) is now acting as a substitute for the fixed wiring of a structure.

Also, NFPA 70-2011, Article 400.7 (B) says each flexible cords shall be equipped with an attachment plug and shall be energized from a receptacle outlet. That also prohibits a flexible cord (i.e. extension cord or power strip) from being plugged into another flexible cord.

Brad Keyes
Brad Keyes, CHSP

Brad is a former advisor to Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) and former Joint Commission LS surveyor. He guides clients through  organizational assessment; management training; ongoing coaching of task groups; and extensive one-on-one coaching of facility leaders. He analyzes and develops leadership effectiveness and efficiency in work processes, focusing on assessing an organization’s preparedness for a survey, evaluating processes in achieving preparedness, and guiding organizations toward compliance. 

As a presenter at national seminars, regional conferences, and audio conferences, Brad teaches the Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp series to various groups and organizations. He is the author or co-author of many HCPro books, including the best-selling  Analyzing the Hospital Life Safety Survey, now in its 3rd edition. Brad has also authored a variety of articles in numerous publications addressing features of life safety and fire protection, as well as white papers and articles on the Building Maintenance Program. Currently serving as the contributing editor of the monthly HCPro newsletter Healthcare Life Safety Compliance  gives Brad further insight into the industry’s trends and best practices.