Corridor Projections

By Brad Keyes…

Q: In regards to corridor width, section 19.2.3.4 of the 2012 LSC discusses that a corridor has to be at least 48-inches outside of a sleeping room in clear width. Does that mean that you only need to worry about situations where your corridor projection will reduce the hallway to less than 48 inches? Is clear width from wall to wall, or from projection to wall? When I had asked our Accreditation Organization for guidance on this issue they stated that we did not need to worry about a projection so long as the corridor still maintained 8 feet from the projection to the other wall. I don’t see that that stated anywhere in my copy of the LSC. Is this true?

A: No… it is not true. Let’s put to rest the erroneous comment that you do not need to worry about a corridor projection so long as the corridor still maintained 8 feet from the projection to the other wall. This is absolutely false. A projection into the corridor is not affected by how much distance to the other wall remains. If someone wants to cling to that statement, then ask them to identify where in the Life Safety Code it permits it (they won’t find it).

According to the CMS Final Rule to adopt the 2012 Life Safety Code that was published May 4, 2016, all CMS-certified healthcare providers cannot have a wall-mounted projection of more than 4 inches. This is measured from 27-inches above the floor to 80-inches above the floor according to the ANSI standard A117.1-2009, section 307.2, which is referenced in the ADA standard. But this also allows for wall-mounted items (i.e. clocks, signs, monitors) to extend more than 4-inches into the corridor as long as they are at least 80-inches above the floor.

This is true no matter how wide your corridor currently is, although some exceptions apply for areas open to the corridor like lobbies and waiting areas.