Corridor Doors Have to Be Fire-Rated?

Q: We have an engineer who is telling us that the 2012 Life Safety Code requires our corridor doors to be fire-rated. He is referencing Table 8.3.4.2 which says exit-access corridor walls that are either 1-hour rated or ½-hour rated require a 20-minute fire-rate door. He says the healthcare occupancy chapter sections 19.3.6.2.4 and 19.3.6.3.2 support this as well. Is this true?

A: Well… it appears your engineer is reading the Life Safety Code wrong. When you want to learn what the Life Safety Code requires pertaining to any subject, you start with the occupancy chapter first, not the core chapters (chapters 1 – 11). Section 19.3.6.3.2 of the 2012 LSC says corridor walls in healthcare occupancies are ½-hour fire-rated and extend from the floor to the deck above. However, in smoke compartments that are protected throughout with approved sprinklers, the corridor walls are permitted to be non-fire-rated, but only resist the passage of smoke and extend from the floor to the ceiling provided the ceiling also resists the passage of smoke.

And according to section 19.3.6.3, doors in corridor walls in healthcare occupancies are only required to resist the passage of smoke, be 1¾-inches thick, solid bonded, wood core, or made of materials that resists fire for a minimum of 20 minutes. This does not mean the door has to be 20-minute rated… just constructed to resist fire for a minimum of 20-minutes.

According to section 4.4.2.3, whenever there is a conflict between the occupancy chapters and the core chapters, the information in the occupancy chapter governs. The information your engineer saw in Table 8.3.4.2 is general information and applies to all occupancies. However, the existing healthcare occupancy chapter differs with information in Table 8.3.4.2, which means the information in the occupancy chapter governs.

I don’t see what you are referring to regarding 19.3.6.3.2. It does not say doors have to be 20-minute rated. It says doors do not have to be 1¾-inches thick, solid bonded, wood core, and resists fire for 20-minutes for certain areas such as toilets rooms, bathrooms, and shower rooms. It is giving you a break for being an existing healthcare occupancy. In some very old hospitals, they installed doors that were not 1¾-inches thick, and this section is permitting them to remain.

And section 19.3.6.2.4 is stating what I’ve already mentioned: Corridor walls in smoke compartments that are fully protected with sprinklers are permitted to be non-fire-rated smoke resistant partitions that extend from the floor to the ceiling, provided the ceiling also resists the passage of smoke.