Coded Words for Fire

Q: Our EP manager was discussing removing the code words like Code pink for a missing infant to missing child and the conversation about code red for fire came up. Someone in the conversation said there is a NFPA code requirement that “Code Red” must be in code form instead of saying “Fire”. I have not heard of this and haven not search yet. I wondered what your take is on this. Our FA system is programmed for voice that states “Code Red” and then the location.

A: Well… that ‘someone’ is actually correct… sort of.

Section 19.7.1.7 of the 2012 Life Safety Code actually does say “When drills are conducted between 9:00 pm and 6:00 am a coded announcement shall be permitted to be used instead of audible alarms.” So this section of the LSC does reference a code-word should be used to identify fire, such as ‘Code Red’.

But that requirement for a coded word for fire is only found in section 19.7.1.7 and is limited to a fire drill conducted without audible alarms between 9:00 pm and 6:00 am. Therefore, since the Life Safety Code does not prohibit it, the conclusion is you would be permitted to say ‘Fire’ instead of ‘Code Red’ when the fire alarm system is activated.

But is that in your best interest to do so? I am aware that there is a trend across the country to eliminate coded words for certain emergency announcements. Many coded words (i.e. ‘Code Pink’) are not used universally in all hospitals, and since healthcare staff is rather transient, the movement is to have announcements identify the actual emergency rather than using coded words. But the original intent in using ‘Code Red’ is to alert staff of a fire condition, yet not alarm visitors and patients un-necessarily, thereby causing a panic.

If it were my hospital, I would be an advocate to allow ‘Code Red’ to remain, but eliminating other coded words should be considered.