Jun 25 2018

Cords on Nurse Call Stations

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Q: We have a behavioral health unit and want to know if pull-cords are required on the nurse-call system in the patient bathroom? Is there an alternative to cords so this type patient can’t hang themselves?

A: The NFPA codes and standards do not address this issue, but the FGI Guidelines do. CMS and the accreditation organizations expect you to follow the FGI Guidelines for new construction, unless there are other more restrictive requirements for other authorities, such as state health departments or local building codes.

Section 2.5-8.3.7.2 of the 2010 FGI Guideline says a nurse call system is not required in psychiatric nursing units, so you do not have to provide cords on the call-buttons. Also, section 2.5-2.4.9.2 says call cords or strings in excess of 6 inches are not permitted. Now, the latter section is for geriatric, Alzheimer’s, or dementia units, but the concept can carry-over to your behavioral health unit.

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Mar 26 2018

Locked Exit Doors From Psychiatric Unit

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Q: I am a consultant and I have a 30% sprinklered high rise hospital with locked psychiatric units. The state authority made them unlock the stairwell doors under the 2000 LSC. The stairwell doors were locked with a key. With the 2012 LSC, can those doors have delayed egress installed for security of patients or does the entire building need to be sprinklered?  The smoke compartments into the stairs in question are sprinklered.

A: No… they cannot install delayed egress locks on any door in the building because section 7.2.1.6.1 of the 2012 LSC requires the entire building to be either fully protected with sprinklers or smoke detectors. I’ve yet to find a hospital that is fully protected with smoke detectors, so it is a safe bet it is not. Since the building is not fully protected with sprinklers, then they cannot install delayed egress locks (7.2.1.6.1), elevator lobby locks (7.2.1.6.3), or specialized protective measure locks (19.2.2.2.5.2). Their only recourse is to install clinical needs locks (19.2.2.2.5.1) or access-control locks (7.2.1.6.2, but access-control locks do not lock the door in the path of egress).

 

Did the state agency explain why they could not lock the stairwell exit doors via clinical needs locks (19.2.2.2.5.1)? Perhaps the hospital did not comply with all of the requirements found in 19.2.2.25.1, or perhaps it was a personal preference of the state inspector…

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