Mar 19 2018

Exit Doors From OR

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
Share

Q: Are operating rooms required to have two (2) exit doors? I have not seen this room but am under the assumption it is between 400 and 500 square feet.

A: According to section 18.2.5.5.2 of the 2012 Life Safety Code, non-sleeping rooms of more than 2500 square feet must have not less than two exit access doors remotely located from each other. Since the operating room you described is 400 to 500 square feet, I would say you are under the threshold for having to meet the requirement to have two doors to the corridor.

Now, if the Surgery area is a suite, there would not be a requirement for two exit access doors until you reached 2500 square feet total for the entire suite, which would include the operating room.

Tags: ,


Mar 02 2018

Doors to Operating Rooms

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
Share

Q: We have two open-heart OR’s. Each has a full 42″ wide door leaf that open to the corridor, and each has a 3’0″ door in the rear of the OR that opens into a central sterile core. The OR walls other than the corridor side are not labeled as a fire/smoke barrier on the life safety drawings. The main OR entrance door that opens into the corridor has a door closer, is rated, and has latching hardware. My question is: The 3′ 0″ doors opening into the sterile core have closers but do they have to be fitted with latching hardware?

A: Not necessarily, provided the sterile core area is qualifies as a room or a suite-of-rooms. What does the life safety drawings say about the sterile core area? Is it classified as a suite? If so, then you should be fine without a latching door between the OR and the sterile core area.

However, if the life safety drawings clearly identify the internal walls of the sterile core area as corridor walls, then the door between the OR and the sterile core area would have to latch. Remember: All corridor doors must latch.

My guess is, the sterile core area probably qualifies as a suite-of-rooms (see section 19.2.5.7 in the LSC) or if small enough, it may qualify as a simple room. As long as the 3’0” door from the OR does not open onto a corridor, then it does not need to latch.

Tags: ,


Feb 12 2018

Operating Room Fire Drills

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
Share

Q: Back in March 2016, you answered a reader’s question that fire drills are not specifically required for operating rooms. While reviewing NFPA 99-2012, I came across a section that states that fire exit drills must be conducted annually or more frequently as determined by the applicable building code, Life Safety Code, or fire code. Does this mean we must conduct fire drills in each of our operating suites every year?

A: Your observations are excellent. Back in March, 2016, there were no requirements to conduct a fire drill in Surgery. Now, after CMS adopted the 2012 edition of NFPA 99, there is. As you pointed out, section 15.13.3.10.3 of NFPA 99-2012, does require an annual fire drill for the operating room and surgical suite personnel.

However, the code does not say a fire drill has to be conducted in each operating room. The purpose of a fire drill in surgery is to provide education and training for staff. Therefore, my suggestion is to schedule the annual fire drill when there are no scheduled surgeries, and as many staff as possible can attend. You begin by conducting an education session on what the expectations are if a fire was discovered in the operating room. You can have different scenarios as the circumstances dictate. Then conduct a drill to see if the staff performs satisfactorily. If you have lots of staff, then utilize multiple operating rooms, and have multiple observers.

Tags: ,


Mar 21 2016

OR Fire Drills

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
Share

Q: We just had an accreditation survey and the surveyor cited us for not having a separate fire drill in the Operating Room Suite. I don’t see this in any code or standard.

A: You are correct in saying that there is no standard which requires a fire drill to be performed in the surgery department. However, there are circumstances where this would be expected, and a surveyor could cite you for not conducting a drill in the OR. Here are some situations that would lead a surveyor to believe a fire drill should be conducted in the operating rooms:

  • Surveyor preference. It is possible that the surveyor has a prejudice for fire drills in the Surgery department. If he/she failed to provide a reason why they cited this finding, then it may be presumed they just did so, because they think it should be done; not because it needs to be done. The surveyor needs to say why a fire drill is needed in the Surgery department.
  • Previous history. If there has been a historical event in your Surgery department (such as a fire during a surgical procedure), then it is a reasonable expectation by the surveyor that you address this issue with fire drills. However, if this is the case, the surveyor needs to state the reason why they are citing you for not conducting fire drills in the Surgery department.
  • Lack of documented response during fire drills. According to accreditation standards, staff must participate in fire drills. This does not mean that a fire drill must be conducted in every unit in the hospital, as staff on the 1st floor may participate in a drill conducted on the 4th floor, as long as the building’s fire alarm system was activated. If the source of the alarm was on the 4th floor, staff on the 1st floor are still expected to participate, by closing doors, and preparing to receive evacuated patients. In many hospitals the expectation is to suspend the start of surgeries during a fire alarm until the ‘all-clear’ signal is given. The way to document that all staff participate in fire drills is to have observers on select units and floors to document what the staff did. If you have no documentation that someone observed how the staff in Surgery responded to the alarm, then I can see where the surveyor may have a legitimate concern for a finding.

If in fact you do have documentation that observed the Surgery staff’s response during a fire drill, then that should qualify as participating in a drill.

Tags: ,