Dec 04 2014

Medical Gas Shutoff Valves

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 6:00 am
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imagesZ7K8PIAPI was recently a bystander amongst a discussion of healthcare facility industry experts, debating the NFPA requirements concerning the accessibility of medical gas shutoff valves in healthcare institutions. The original question asked was where does it specifically state that a medical gas zone valve box cannot have a wheeled obstruction in front it of it? While it is intuitive to keep the area in front of the shutoff valves clear, the question was a good one, as it appears the NFPA codes and standards do not specifically address the requirement to keep it clear.

The discussion that ensued was informative, as various standards were referenced as to support the opinion of the presenter. For example; Joint Commission standard EC.02.05.09, EP 3 says the valves must be accessible. But TJC does not define what ‘accessible’ means. According to the online dictionary, accessible is a place which is able to be reached or entered. So, if a wheeled gurney is placed in front of a medical gas shutoff valve, is it still accessible, if staff can reach over the gurney and actuate the valve? Or, is the shutoff valve still accessible if the gurney can be moved so staff can reach the valves?

The only one who can answer that question is the authority who is enforcing that standard, which is The Joint Commission in this case, but the other accreditation organizations have similar standards and they make their own interpretations as well. According to most of those in the discussion, Joint Commission and the other accreditation organizations are writing up hospitals and ambulatory surgical centers that have anything placed in front of the medical gas shutoff valves.

Another individual referenced NFPA 99, 1999 edition, which governs medical gas systems for healthcare institutions. Section 4-3.1.2.3 (i) which requires manual shutoff valves in boxes to be installed where they are visible and accessible at all times; the boxes should not be installed behind normally open or normally closed doors, or otherwise hidden from plain view. This description would seem to support the concept that the definition of accessible could include a wheeled object to be placed in front of the valves as long as the valves were accessible. At the least, it doesn’t seem to prohibit that.

But yet another individual said take a look at NFPA 99 (1999 edition), section 4-2.1.2.3 (d) on zone valves. For sake of clarity, I will repeat it here word-for-word (bold emphasis is mine):

Station outlets shall not be supplied directly from a riser unless a manual shutoff valve located in the same story is installed between the riser and the outlet with a wall intervening between the valve and the outlet. This valve shall be readily operable from a standing position in the corridor on the same floor it serves. Each lateral branch line serving patient rooms shall be provided with a shutoff valve that controls the flow of medical gas to the patient rooms. Zone valves shall be arranged that shutting off the supply of gas to one zone will not affect the supply of medical gas to the rest of the system. A pressure gauge shall be provided downstream of each zone valve.

The above description is found under a section titled “Zone Valve”. The bolded section in the above description refers to the requirement of a manual shutoff valve that is located on the same story which is readily operable from a standing position in the corridor. That’s not necessarily the zone valve, but why isn’t this description also included in section 4-3.1.2.3 (i) which describes shutoff valves? The 2012 edition of NFPA 99 further elaborates on ‘Zone Valves’ and describes them in the same way that most people think of shutoff valves.

According to the online dictionary, the word ‘readily’ means without difficulty or delay; easily or quickly. So section 4-3.1.2.3 (d) of NFPA 99 (1999 edition) makes it pretty clear that the manual shutoff valve for the room outlets must be operated easily, and without delay. Parking a wheeled gurney in front of a medical gas shutoff valve could easily delay the operation of the valve; or at the minimum, it would provide a hindrance to the operation of the valve. Therefore, the wheeled gurney (or any other object) would not be permitted to be placed in front of the medical gas shutoff valves.

I think the accreditation organizations have got this issue correct. Anything that blocks access to a medical gas shutoff valves (whether it is called a shutoff valve or a zone valve) hinders the ‘readily operable’ capability of the medical gas valves, and would be a citable offense.

 

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Sep 19 2013

Medical Gas Shutoff Valves

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 5:00 am
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Medical Gas Shutoff Valves Blocked by Door Web 2

I received this picture recently from a good friend who works in a hospital, and is responsible for plumbing and power plant operation. He wanted to know if the medical gas shutoff valves which are located behind this door, are permitted since the valve box can be seen through the window in the door.

Apparently, the hospital installed new smoke compartment barrier doors in this area, and the previous doors were single-egress doors, which means both doors swung in the same direction. Well, according to section 4.6.7 of the Life Safety Code (2000 edition) when you make alterations and install new equipment, you must meet the conditions of the new occupancy chapter of the Life Safety Code, which in this case would be Chapter 18. Section 18. 3.7.5 requires new cross-corridor smoke compartment barrier doors to swing in opposite directions, or as commonly called, dual egress.

So, what happens in so many hospitals where the project team is not part of the facilities management team, some things get built or installed without the consultation and knowledge of those individuals who know the codes and standards the best. Now, I suspect my friend who sent me this picture knew the answer to the question before he sent it. At times, people need the assistance from consultants in order to emphasize the need for their own fellow employees to take action.

So, for those who may not know the answer… No. This condition is not acceptable.  According to section 4-3.1.2.3(i) of NFPA 99 (1999 edition), the shutoff valves must be installed where they are visible and accessible at all times. The [valve] boxes must not be installed behind normally open or normally closed doors, or otherwise hidden from plain view.

So what we see in the picture would likely be cited by a surveyor or inspector, especially since they can partially see the shutoff valve box through the window in the door. My friend says he will move the valve box, but I suspect that will cost quite a bit of funds, and a certain amount of medical gas interruption for the nursing unit. Not the best way to run projects.

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Oct 04 2012

Electrical Appliances Not Located in the Patient Care Vicinity

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 5:00 am
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I was recently asked how Joint Commission and other authorities look at  electrical items used by staff that do not come into contact with patients, such as refrigerators, fans, coffee pots and lamps.  Do hospitals have to remove all of these personal use appliances? The short and quick answer is No, but there are some things you need to be aware of.

When they do not have a direct standard which addresses the issue, Joint Commission will refer to NFPA 99 on the use and testing requirements for electrical equipment. They are permitted in the hospital, but they must be checked before they are placed into service. Take a look at section 7-5.2.2.1 of NFPA 99 (1999 edition) which says:

Patient Care Area: The leakage current for facility owned appliances (e.g. housekeeping or maintenance appliances) that are used in a patient care vicinity and are likely to contact the patient shall be measured. The leakage current shall be less than 500 microamperes. Tests shall be made with Switch A in Figure 7-5.1.3.5 in the open position for two-wire equipment that is not double-insulated. Household or office appliances not commonly equipped with grounding conductors in their power cords shall be permitted provided they are not located within the patient care vicinity. For example, electric typewriters, pencil sharpeners, and clocks at nurses’ stations, or electric clocks or TVs that are normally outside the patient care vicinity but might be in a patient’s room, shall not be required to have grounding conductors in their power cords.”

Note: Patient care vicinity is defined as a space for the examination and treatment of patients which extends 6 feet beyond the normal location of the bed, table, chair, treadmill, or other device that supports the patient during examination and treatment, and extends to 7 feet 6 inches above the floor.

As you may deduce, there is not a clear and simple standard that directly regulates electric appliances (such as lamps, refrigerators, fans and coffee pots) when they are not used in patient care vicinities. Here is what I believe Joint Commission and other authorities will expect from your organization in regards to electrical appliances that are away from the patient care vicinity:

1. Write into your Safety Management Plan (or it can be a separate policy referenced into your management plan) the organization’s plan of action concerning electrical devices that are not to be used within the patient care vicinity.

2. Upon initial installation (or before initial installation when the equipment is received at the hospital) conduct a current leakage test on the device, and document same. No further testing is required. If the device is removed and relocated, then a visual examination of the electrical cord needs to be conducted. No record of this visual examination is required.

3. Include language prohibiting the use of extension cords, power strips, adapters from 3-prong to 2-prong, and three-way adapters without the consent and permission of the Facilities department.

Having a policy on an issue when there is not a clear standard governing the issue, is an excellent way to demonstrate to the Joint Commission that you recognize the potential risk involved with the use of the device, and you have a plan to address it. If an electrical appliance shows up that doesn’t exactly fit into this policy, then conduct a risk assessment identifying all of the potential risks to patients, visitors and staff, and have it reviewed and approved by your safety committee.

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