Jan 02 2018

Construction Safety at a Hospital

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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I learned recently that a hospital is being sued by the family of a woman who fell in a construction zone and subsequently died. The 85-year-old woman walked past an empty nurses station, through an unlocked door, and fell into a construction pit inside the facility.

The woman suffered a traumatic brain injury and subdural hematoma from the fall, according to court records. In the three weeks before she died, she could rarely recognize her daughter and suffered nightmares.

According to the lawsuit, the state department of health and social services had inspected the hospital 9 days before the accident and noted in a 58-page report that the center had three doors leading to construction areas that, in violation of state safety codes, were left unlocked.

This is a tragedy and I’m sure everyone involved feels terrible about the incident. I purposely did not identify the hospital because that’s not the point… I’m sure they are beating themselves up over this as well.

But it sure appears it was preventable… especially after the state inspectors came in and told them they needed to lock the doors to the construction area.

Every hospitals claims to have excellent patient safety at the foremost of their efforts. And I believe what they mean when they say patient safety is safety concerning clinical and medical issues. What many hospitals seem to overlook or flat-out ignore is Life Safety, Physical Environment Safety and Construction Safety is patient safety as well.

This story is a reminder that construction business is not business as usual when it happens in a hospital. Nothing is ‘as usual’ in a hospital. That is why the business of healthcare is one of the most regulated industries in America.

The hospital in the story had a warning from the state 9 days before the tragic accident. If they had complied with state’s findings, it is likely this tragedy would never had happened.

I want you to understand when the state agencies, accreditation organizations, and local authorities conduct a survey or an inspection at your facility, they are there to help you from hurting yourselves and your patients and staff from safety violations that you are not aware of. Embrace that process and learn from those surveys and inspections. It likely will keep you from tragic situations like the one described above.

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Dec 18 2014

Contractors During a Survey

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 6:00 am
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images[3]It has always been my belief that as the surveyor team walks in the front door of the hospital on the first day of the survey, all of the contractors should be walking out the back door. For the most part (and I do understand that there are exceptions), contractors should be sent away once you know there are surveyors in the house. Why? Because they will get you in trouble one way or another.

I recently received an email from a reader who shared this story:

During our triennial survey the life safety surveyor asked me how we knew that the fire alarm system signal was received by our monitoring company. I could not immediately answer the question, but we were lucky to have the service contractor in the building doing his quarterly testing and I suggested we ask him.

The service technician explained that the software in the fire alarm control system will indicate if the alarm is received by the monitoring company within the designated amount of time. I was quite happy with the service technician’s explanation until the surveyor said “Prove that it happened at least quarterly for the past 12 months”.

The service technician said nobody could prove it; we just have to take his word for it. [Wrong answer.] The surveyor asked “Don’t you call them by telephone to confirm they received the signal?” The service technician replied, saying “Well, would you trust me if I said I did call?”

The surveyor was correct to ask the questions that he/she did. The service technician was probably answering them to the best of his ability, but the real problem is the facility manager allowed the surveyor to enter into a conversation with a contractor. During a survey, the hospital staff should try and control the process as much as possible. By allowing a surveyor to ask questions of a contractor, the facility manager lost control of the situation and will suffer any consequences of what a contractor may say.

Contractors are not trained and educated in the regulatory requirements the same way the hospital staff is (or should be). The contractors may not even know or understand the significance of an accreditation survey, or worse, a CMS certification survey. Service technicians have a tendency to take an attitude that they know more about the system they are working on than the hospital does, and for the most part they do. Otherwise, the hospital would not hire them. But the service technician my not know what specific regulations that the hospital must comply with and therefore may say something to a surveyor that may get you in trouble.

I’m not saying you should not be transparent in your processes, but during a survey, you need to control as much as you can of the survey process. This is not unethical or wrong; it is just smart business. Let the surveyor go where he/she wants; let the surveyor ask questions all they want; but eliminate the potential “loose cannons” that are not very well educated on the survey process by sending them home during the survey.

Another reader sent me an email earlier this year explaining that on a day during the accreditation survey a roofing contractor set a pallet of roofing material right in the middle of the exit discharge of a staff entrance/exit to the hospital. Nobody from the hospital was aware that the roofing contractor was about to do that, but the surveyor noticed it as soon as it happened and it went into the survey deficiency report.

When I was a surveyor for The Joint Commission, I would purposely seek out contractors and ask them what training the hospital provided them on fire safety procedures. Ultimately, contractors are expected to know the same fire response procedures as the staff. Invariably they could not answer the question satisfactory and it would be cited in the survey deficiency report.

I know that in some situations you cannot send the contractors home for the duration of the survey, but it seems that a large percentage of them could. At the hospital where I worked as the Safety Officer, I asked the project management team to send the contractors away during the week of the survey (this was when the surveys were announced). The project managers thought that was a good idea, but we were over-ruled by the COO of the hospital, because he did not want the opening of the new renovated unit to be delayed. That ended up being a costly mistake. The hospital had a policy that every contractor had to receive basic safety orientation before they begin their work on the campus of the organization. Unbeknownst to the hospital, the general contractor brought in a sub-contractor to install flooring in one area, and they did not go through the safety training because the general thought it would be “okay” since the sub was only going to be there for one day. Sure enough, the surveyor found that one sub who had not received the safety training which lead to a finding on the survey deficiency report.

You need to control what you can, and sending the contractors away is the smart thing to do during a survey.

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