Posts

Strange Observations -Disabled Latches

Continuing in a series of strange things that I have seen while consulting at hospitals…

Boy… I bet you’ve never had this problem at your facility, eh?

[Sarcasm]

This is why you need to do frequent rounds (i.e. weekly, if needed) to spot these trends and nip it in the bud.

Healthcare staff will frequently tape over a latch on a door or on a strike on the frame to make it easier to gain access to a utility room.

Marked Fire/Smoke Doors

Q: We are reviewing fire policy, and are wondering if it is a Life Safety Code requirement to have fire and smoke barrier doors labeled as such? By this I mean a sign or sticker on the face of the door stating: “smoke barrier” or “fire barrier”?

A: No… there is no Life Safety Code requirement to post signage on smoke barrier doors or fire-rated door assemblies, identifying them as such. I do not see any CMS or Accreditation Organization requirement to do so, either. However, it’s not a bad idea as long as the signage meets the limitation of NFPA 80 for fire-rated door assemblies. I have seen hospitals identify their smoke barrier doors, that helps their staff be aware of the smoke compartment locations. I think that works well for many organizations. Please check with your state and local authorities to determine if they have any requirements.

 

Compliance One Presents Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp – February 7 & 8, 2019

Understand practical applications of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®! Learn from a Life Safety surveyor on what to prepare for during surveys! A 2-day Boot Camp on the comprehensive examination of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®, as it applies to healthcare organizations; presented by Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC and Compliance One.

Date: February 7 & 8, 2019

Location: The Boot Camp will be held at Jackson-Madison County General Hospital in the J. Walter Barnes Conference Center, located at 620 Skyline Drive, Jackson, TN 38301.

Topics:
• LSC Origins & Organization • Smoke Compartments • Occupancy Designations
• Suites • Construction Types • Additions & Renovations
• Operating Features • Means of Egress • Door Locks
• Ambulatory Surgical Centers • Fire Barriers • Hazardous Areas
• Building Services • Fire Protection Systems • Understanding CMS
• Strange Observations • Key Interpretations by Accreditation Organizations • Documentation Needed for a Successful Survey

Who Should Attend:
• Facility Managers • Safety Officers • Chief Operating Officers
• Accreditation Coordinators • Architect/Engineers • Consultants

Presenter:
Brad Keyes, CHSP, owner of Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC; and former Joint Commission LS surveyor.

Cost: Early-bird registration is $789.00 per participant and is valid through December 31, 2018. Starting January 1, 2019 the rate is $889.00 per attendee.

Includes: Workbook, seminar materials, opening night reception, and breakfast and lunch each day; Does not include hotel, or travel. Certificate of Attendance awarded on completion.

Hotel: The designated hotel to stay is the Doubletree Hotel, 1770 Highway 45 Bypass, Jackson TN 38305. Use Group Code ‘LSB’ for discount pricing. Transportation between hotel and Jackson-Madison County General hospital will be provided.

Register Early: Seating is limited to 50 individuals – Previous boot camps have sold out.  Registration will close on January 15, 2019. To register, go to https://complianceonegroup.com/westtennesseehealthcare/

Registration is not confirmed until payment is received. Registration closes when all seats are filled, or January 15, 2019

Cancellation Policy: Due to limited seating, you may cancel your registration up to 2-weeks prior to the scheduled boot camp. Cancellations will incur a $25.00 fee.

Bring your own copy of the 2012 Life Safety Code!

Exclusively presented by:

Offsite Locations

Q: For clinics that are in a facility classified as business occupancy, is an ICRA required?

A: For Joint Commission accredited organizations, their hospital standards apply to all offsite locations that are considered hospital departments even if it is not classified as healthcare occupancy. For example, if a hospital has an offsite therapy unit in a local mall, the Environment of Care and Life Safety chapter requirements must apply to the offsite location, in accordance with the respective occupancy designation. This means, where the hospital is a healthcare occupancy, an offsite therapy unit would likely be a business occupancy, but the requirements found in the EC and LS chapters still apply at the therapy unit, but in accordance with business occupancy classification.

So, the requirement for an Infection Control Risk assessment (ICRA) is found in EC.02.06.05, EP 2 in the Hospital Accreditation Manual. The expectation is the hospital would conduct an ICRA at an offsite location when planning for construction as long as it is a hospital department. This concept of the Joint Commission standards applying at offsite locations is explained in the Overview to the EC and LS chapters.

Smoke Dampers in Corridor Walls?

Q: In regards to suite separations, section 18.2.5.7.1.2 of 2012 LSC requires walls separating suites to meet requirements for corridor walls, which have to be constructed to limit transfer of smoke. There don’t seem to be any requirements for smoke dampers in air transfer openings or duct penetrations through corridor walls – is this correct?

A: Well… you’re sort of correct. Corridor walls in fully sprinklered smoke compartments are required to be smoke partitions… not smoke barriers. The 2012 Life Safety Code does not require smoke dampers in HVAC ductwork that penetrate smoke partitions. But section 18/19.3.6.4.1 prohibits the use of air-transfer openings in corridor walls.

Strange Observations – Ceiling Gaps

Continuing in a series of strange things that I have seen while consulting at hospitals…

Ceilings that contain smoke detectors and/or sprinkler heads have to resist the passage of smoke.

For ceilings that are constructed with acoustical tile and grid assembly, this can be challenging in electrical rooms, or IT rooms where there are a lot of penetrations.

Gaps between the ceiling tile and the conduit cannot exceed 1/8-inch.

Equivalencies for Exit Enclosures

Q: We have a hospital with a number of exit enclosures. These passageways have a large number of unrelated utilities running above the ceiling. Modification will not only be very expensive, but very difficult. Can we use NFPA 101A FSES equivalencies for alternate compliance?

A: Section 7.1.3.2.1 (10)(h) of the 2012 LSC does say “Existing penetrations protected in accordance with 8.3.5” as an exception regarding utility penetrations into an exit enclosure, so the undesirable utility penetrations in the exit enclosures may be acceptable if you can prove they are ‘existing’ conditions. According to CMS, anything designed or constructed prior to July 5, 2016 is considered existing conditions as far as the 2012 Life Safety Code goes, but not all other authorities agree with this concept entirely. Ever since the 1988 edition and all of the subsequent editions of the LSC, it has said that penetrations of ductwork, conduit, pipes, etc., that do not serve the exit enclosure are prohibited.

Many authorities having jurisdiction enforce this to present day…. Meaning if the utility was installed in 1992 in the exit enclosure but does not serve the exit enclosure, then it still can be cited today because it was not installed correctly ‘back then’. But the 1985 edition does not say that. So, any utility installed in an exit enclosure that does not serve the exit enclosure before the 1988 edition was adopted would be considered ‘existing’ and since it wasn’t prohibited when it was installed, it would be permitted to remain, provided it met the requirements of 8.3.5. For CMS, they were on the 1985 edition until March 11, 2003.

But Joint Commission had been adopting the new editions of the LSC shortly after they were published. So, they were on the 1991 edition back in 1992, which is as far as my memory goes. It’s all a crap-shoot…. Some surveyors will recognize the July 5, 2016 date as the only threshold between new and existing and will allow the existing utilities in the exit enclosure, and then some surveyors will be more scrutinizing and try to determine when the utilities were installed. But to answer your question, if you get cited, you could always go for an equivalency (NFPA 101A FSES) as part of your Plan of Correction, but you would have to prove a significant hardship in complying with the LSC.

One can assume it will be costly to install a 2-hour fire-rated ceiling in the exit enclosure to cover-up the utilities, but the CMS Regional Office is the entity to make the decision to approve the FSES equivalency or not, and you need to convince them whether or not it is a significant hardship. CMS does not accept equivalencies unless the deficiency is first cited, so you will have to wait to get cited by your accreditor or state agency surveying on behalf of CMS. And don’t forget to conduct an assessment for ILSMs now of the deficiency… most authorities will expect you to do so. But equivalencies are only valid until the next triennial survey, so it would be best to make long-range plans to resolve the issue, rather than continuously presenting equivalency requests.

Compliance One Presents Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp – February 7 & 8, 2019

Understand practical applications of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®! Learn from a Life Safety surveyor on what to prepare for during surveys! A 2-day Boot Camp on the comprehensive examination of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®, as it applies to healthcare organizations; presented by Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC and Compliance One.

Date: February 7 & 8, 2019

Location: The Boot Camp will be held at Jackson-Madison County General Hospital in the J. Walter Barnes Conference Center, located at 620 Skyline Drive, Jackson, TN 38301.

Topics:
• LSC Origins & Organization • Smoke Compartments • Occupancy Designations
• Suites • Construction Types • Additions & Renovations
• Operating Features • Means of Egress • Door Locks
• Ambulatory Surgical Centers • Fire Barriers • Hazardous Areas
• Building Services • Fire Protection Systems • Understanding CMS
• Strange Observations • Key Interpretations by Accreditation Organizations • Documentation Needed for a Successful Survey

Who Should Attend:
• Facility Managers • Safety Officers • Chief Operating Officers
• Accreditation Coordinators • Architect/Engineers • Consultants

Presenter:
Brad Keyes, CHSP, owner of Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC; and former Joint Commission LS surveyor.

Cost: Early-bird registration is $789.00 per participant and is valid through December 31, 2018. Starting January 1, 2019 the rate is $889.00 per attendee.

Includes: Workbook, seminar materials, opening night reception, and breakfast and lunch each day; Does not include hotel, or travel. Certificate of Attendance awarded on completion.

Hotel: The designated hotel to stay is the Doubletree Hotel, 1770 Highway 45 Bypass, Jackson TN 38305. Use Group Code ‘LSB’ for discount pricing. Transportation between hotel and Jackson-Madison County General hospital will be provided.

Register Early: Seating is limited to 50 individuals – Previous boot camps have sold out.  Registration will close on January 15, 2019. To register, go to https://complianceonegroup.com/westtennesseehealthcare/

Registration is not confirmed until payment is received. Registration closes when all seats are filled, or January 15, 2019

Cancellation Policy: Due to limited seating, you may cancel your registration up to 2-weeks prior to the scheduled boot camp. Cancellations will incur a $25.00 fee.

Bring your own copy of the 2012 Life Safety Code!

Exclusively presented by:

Life Safety Drawings

Q: I just got done with a triennial accreditation survey at one of my facilities and the engineer surveyor requested LSC drawings for all buildings that support patients, not just the in-patient buildings. The support buildings are business occupancy and patients do not sleep in these areas, they only go to these building for program. We are surveyed under Behavioral Health. History has it we have never had to provide LSC drawings for non-inpatient buildings. Have you ever heard of the drawings being requested for all buildings?

A: Oh, sure. This is a common, if not a normal practice. Ask yourself this question: How can you adequately maintain the rated barriers in your offsite business occupancies if you don’t have LS drawings showing their location? How can you demonstrate to the surveyor that your travel distances are within limits? How can you demonstrate to the surveyor that your hazardous areas are properly maintained if you (or he) does not know where they are?

LS drawings are important for all the buildings you maintain… not just the hospital. This finding should not be a deal-breaker with the accreditor… meaning, you may receive a citation (or you may not), but if you do, it will not be a Condition Level Finding. Bully for the LS surveyor for asking to see those LS drawings.

Tamper-Proof Screws in Psychiatric Unit

Q: Do all of the screw heads in a psych ward need to be tamper proof?

A: There is no specific code or standard that addresses screw heads in a psych unit, but CMS and the accreditation organizations have a standard that requires you to provide a safe environment for your patients and staff. Therefore, having a screw head in a psych unit that is not the tamper-proof style would likely be a citation by a surveyor because the environment is not considered safe by their point-of-view.