Aug 09 2012

Sprinklers in Existing Healthcare Occupancies

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 5:00 am
Share

This may seem basic to some of you, but one of the problems in the healthcare facilities management industry is people don’t always have a good solid foundation of the basics. From time to time, I have a conversation with a client about challenges they are having in regards to installing sprinklers in their existing facilities. Frequently they ask me how they should enter their sprinkler project into the Joint Commission Statement of Conditions (SOC), Plan For Improvement (PFI) list. Eventually I get around to asking the question “Why are you installing sprinklers?” Now, don’t get me wrong, I’m a firm believer in sprinklers as they do save lives in the event of a fire, and I am all for hospitals and nursing homes retroactively installing them, but I want to make sure the client fully understands their options.

First of all, let’s make it very clear that the 2000 edition of the Life Safety Code (LSC) does not require existing healthcare occupancies to be protected with automatic sprinklers, unless the Construction Type or an approved equivalency requires it. Existing conditions is defined as the local authority having approved construction documents for new construction or renovation projects before March 11, 2003. Why March 11, 2003? Because that’s the date the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) approved the 2000 edition of the LSC. There is a caveat to this issue, and that is the LSC has required new construction and renovation to be protected with automatic sprinklers since the 1991 edition, so if your organization was required to comply with the 1991 (and subsequent) edition(s), then new construction and renovation conducted since the time that edition was adopted by your authorities needs to be sprinklered. CMS went directly from the 1985 edition of the LSC to the 2000 edition on March 11, 2003. I know Joint Commission had adopted the 1994 and the 1997 editions prior to adopting the 2000 edition on March 1, 2003 (Yes, they adopted the 2000 edition 10 days earlier than CMS…), but I do not know if and when they ever adopted the 1991 edition.

Construction Type is a NFPA reference describing the general fire resistance of the construction materials used to build the facility, and the level of fire protection on key structural members of the building, as measured in hours. So, Construction Type II (222) which is the most common type  for hospitals, would be a building constructed with fire resistant materials (such as concrete, brick, stone, gypsum board, etc.) and has key structural members (such as load bearing walls, beams, joists, trusses, floor decks) with a 2-hour fire resistant rating. Generally speaking, the taller the building the greater the Construction Type must be. According to the existing healthcare occupancy chapter (19) in the LSC, some lessor Construction Types in existing constructions must be sprinklered. In some cases an equivalency will specify sprinklers in an existing condition in order to gain enough points to be successful. If you have any approved equivalencies, check them out to see if automatic sprinklers are a condition of their approval.

So, getting back to the client with the question about entering the sprinkler project into the SOC PFI list, I ask them “Why are you installing sprinklers?” If they say it is just a desire of theirs to have a fully sprinklered facility, then that is not a LSC deficiency, and they cannot enter that into their PFI list. The PFI list is reserved only for deficiencies with the Life Safety Code. Now, if they are installing sprinklers because they are renovating an area,or correcting a deficiency with their Construction Type, or need the points on an equivalency, then that is a life safety deficiency and the sprinkler project may be entered into the PFI list.

Confusing? That’s all-right, as it can be. Rome wasn’t built in a day, and everything a facility manager needs to know about the Life Safety Code is not learned by just reading a blog posting…. But it can help!

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

P.S. Be prepared for changes when the 2012 edition of the Life Safety Code is finally adopted (probably in 2014 or 2015). The new edition will require existing nursing homes to be fully protected with automatic sprinklers, and existing hospitals that are considered high-rise facilities to be fully protected with automatic sprinklers. A high-rise building is greater than 75 feet in height where the building height is measured from the lowest level of fire department vehicle access to the floor of the highest occupiable story. A penthouse mechanical room would not typically be considered an occupiable story.

Tags: , , ,