Oct 10 2017

Power Strips

Category: CMS,Power Strips,Questions and AnswersBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Q: There is so much discussion on the proper use of power strips that it can cause confusion amongst even the seasoned facility managers. There is absolutely no guarantee that the different power strips will remain in their ‘designated areas’. The OR is much easier to control, but as technology quickly progresses, the space between patient care vicinities and non-patient care vicinities quickly losing the defined lines. What’s your thoughts on the power strip issue?

A: I do see your point that power strips may be difficult to control as they may move around the hospital, in and out of patient care vicinities. And I respect your comment that there is confusion on the proper use of power strips. But I find CMS’ explanation regarding power strips under their K-Tag 920 to be refreshingly simple:

  • Power strips in a patient care vicinity are only used on movable patient-care related electrical equipment and are permanently attached to the equipment, and are UL 1363A or UL 60601-1.
  • Power strips in a patient care vicinity may not be used for non-patient-care related electrical equipment, such as personal electronics, except in long-term care resident rooms that do not use patient-care related electrical equipment.
  • Power strips for patient-care related electrical equipment must meet UL 1363A or UL 60601-1.
  • Power strips for non-patient-care related electrical equipment in the patient care rooms, but outside of the patient care vicinity, must meet UL 1363.
  • In non-patient care rooms, power strips meet other UL standards.

Section 3.3.139 defines “patient care vicinity” as a space, within a location intended for the examination and treatment of patients, extending 6 feet beyond the normal location of the bed, chair, table, treadmill, or other device that supports the patient during examination and treatment and extending vertically to 7-foot 6-inches above the floor.

It appears K-Tag 920 is permitting qualified personnel to permanently attach UL 1363A or UL 60601-1 power strips to movable patient-care related electrical equipment, provided it meets section 10.2.3.6 of NFPA 99-2012, which is:

  • The power strip is permanently attached to the equipment assembly;
  • The sum of the ampacity of all appliances connected to the outlets does not exceed 75% of the ampacity of the flexible cord supplying the outlets;
  • The ampacity of the flexible cord is in accordance with NFPA 70-2011, National Electrical Code.
  • The electrical and mechanical integrity of the assembly is regularly verified and documented.

This section does not explain what makes one “qualified”, so that determination should be left to the AHJ and the healthcare facility. While NFPA 99-2012 does not specify how frequent “regularly verified” means, the general consensus is annually, based on annual receptacle inspection requirements in Chapter 6.

You will note that section 10.2.3.6. (5) was deleted per Tentative Interim Amendment (TIA) 12-5.

K-Tag 920 is also clear that outside of a non-patient care room (i.e. OR, PACU, procedure room, patient sleeping room, etc.) CMS no longer regulates which UL power strip to use on non-patient-care related electrical equipment, other than it must be UL listed. That means a power strip used at a nurse station on office equipment, or in an office environment does not have to be UL 1363, UL 1363A, or UL 60601-1; it just has to be UL listed.