Penetrations in Corridor Walls

Q: Our life safety drawings identify the corridors in our hospital as being smoke partitions. My question is do wall penetrations above the dropped ceiling need to be sealed with a fire caulk like products used in 1 and 2 hour walls?

A: According to the Life Safety Code, a hospital corridor wall is required to be meet two-different standards, based on whether or not the smoke compartment where the corridor is located is fully protected with sprinklers. If protected with sprinklers, then the corridor wall is permitted to be smoke resistant (not-fire-rated) and extend from the floor to the deck, or from the floor to the ceiling if the ceiling also resists the passage of smoke. Be aware, however, that where NFPA recognizes that a suspended grid and tile ceiling does resist the passage of smoke, the IBC does not.

The other corridor wall requirement is where the smoke compartment is not fully protected with sprinklers, then the corridor wall must be 30-minute fire-rated and extend from the floor to the deck above. There is no exception to terminate at the ceiling if the ceiling resists the passage of smoke. NFPA describes a 30-minute fire-rated wall as steel studs with one layer of gypsum board on one side.

Since you state your corridor walls are smoke partitions, then the question is, do they have to extend all the way to the deck or do they qualify to terminate at the ceiling provided the ceiling also resists the passage of smoke? Since these are smoke partitions and not fire-rated barriers, you would be permitted to use non-rated, non-combustible caulk to seal any penetration, in lieu of using fire-rated materials.