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The following comment is a result of an article that I ran last September on decorations (search: Decorations or Communications?). This comment is from a representative from a state agency that performs surveys on behalf of CMS.

I recently read your article on Decorations. I thought the advice was really good information. I was contacted by a facility not too long ago that asked me if a large, homemade tapestry brought to a resident’s room would need to be fire retardant if it was hung up. The question from the engineer was valid as it was to be hung as a “decoration”, was made of flammable material and the family wanted to hang it in the corridor. He wanted to know if it should be fire-treated. His argument was focused on not allowing the family to bring it in at all, mostly because he found it objectionable. I related to him the code; how it could be both stringently and loosely interpreted and suggested, as you pointed out, to err on the side of caution and either treat it or suggest to the family it wasn’t allowed by the standard. The main issue was that the family wanted to hang it in the corridor, which I pointed out could potentially affect safe egress. I then asked him what he felt would be a surveyor’s opinion if this same decoration was hung inside the room, or used as a blanket.

I pointed out that many times I am in a facility where the family has brought in a blanket, or other homemade decoration to make their loved ones feel at home during their stay, or possibly their final hours. I stated I view those items based upon the possible risk, and the intent of the standard. More often than not I find they pose no greater risk to the facility’s other occupants than the same person’s bathrobe knitted by their aunt (when solely used or displayed inside their respective room).

Point being that speaking for myself, I view it solely based on each individual situation: If the facility is providing it and it poses a possible risk to the safe housing or evacuation of all occupants, I will look at that risk and evaluate the issue, citing it if it is apparent and substantiated. I will not unnecessarily burden a resident, patient, client, family or staff member for the purpose of removing something that falls within the letter of the rule for the sole purpose of demonstrating that rule. As always, “it depends”.

I find it refreshing that a state surveyor would have compassion and evaluate issues on a case by case basis. But if this is not done carefully, it can lead to inconsistent interpretations and cause problems when AHJs do not agree on the same issue.

I think hospitals have too many AHJs conducting inspections and surveys in their facility, as it often leads to differences of opinion on how an issue should be interpreted by the AHJs. Ultimately, the hospitals often have to ‘do-over’ a construction project because they receive poor advice from an architect, or an incorrect interpretation from an AHJ.

No wonder healthcare costs so much…