Mar 12 2015

Occupational Therapy Cooking Equipment

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 1:00 am

physical-rehab-lab[1]A reader recently inquired about a residential style stove/oven used in their new hospital for occupational therapy patients. He wanted to know if this residential style stove was required to have a commercial-style exhaust hood, complete with fire suppression equipment. He also wanted to know if the room where the stove was located was required to have smoke detectors and a Class K fire extinguisher.

A residential style stove/oven that is used for occupational therapy purposes is not a cooking appliance; it is therapy equipment. As long as only rehab patients are using the stove and staff does not use the stove for their personal use, the case can be made to a surveyor or an inspector that the equipment is not cooking equipment, and is not subject to meeting the requirements of section 9.2.3 of the 2000 LSC for fire suppression.

Also, section of the 2000 LSC says domestic cooking equipment that is used for food-warming or limited cooking does not have to be equipped with the fire suppression equipment required by section 9.2.3. Typically, the only residential style stove/oven appliance found in a hospital is located in the rehab/therapy unit and is used for occupational therapy; not food preparation. Whatever a patient would be doing at the stove would be considered ‘limited cooking’.

Also, section 9.2.3 of the 2000 LSC references NFPA 96 Standard for Ventilation Control and Fire Protection of Commercial Cooking Operations (1998 edition), which is the standard for fire suppression for cooking hoods, only applies to commercial cooking equipment. A residential style stove/oven used for occupational therapy is not a piece of commercial cooking equipment, so based on that interpretation, NFPA 96 does not apply.

And, if those points don’t change the mind of an over-zealous surveyor, according to NFPA 96, fire suppression systems are not required in cooking appliances that do not produce grease laden vapors. The presumption is an occupational therapy patient would not be frying up a pound of bacon, or other food products that produce grease laden vapors. And if they are, then perhaps there should be some means to catch the grease laden vapors.

A Class K fire extinguisher would not be required to be mounted within 30 feet of the residential style stove/oven that is used for occupational therapy since it does not involve combustible cooking oils or fat. NFPA 10 (1998 edition) states Class K extinguishers are only required when there is a potential for fire from cooking oils and fats that are combustible. Again, the presumption is there would not be a deep fat fryer or other appliances that would use combustible cooking oils in the occupational therapy program.

There is no requirement for any smoke detectors in or around the room that contains the residential style stove/oven used for occupational therapy purposes. I would strongly suggest that there not be any detectors in this area, unless there are other reasons for them. Any smoke generated from burnt food may cause unwanted alarms.

I also suggested to the reader that he write up a risk assessment or a policy (or management plan) identifying the above points as evidence that their facility gave this some serious consideration, and have their Safety Committee review and approve it. If challenged by a surveyor, they could present their risk assessment, policy or management plan indicating that they’ve done their due diligence and the conclusion is the equipment does not have to comply with NFPA 96 for exhaust hood or fire suppression systems.

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