Jan 15 2015

More on the CMS S&C Memo Concerning Power Strips

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 6:00 am
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12-120-878-TS[1]I received a question from a reader that I was unable to immediately answer. The question dealt with the use of power strips in a business occupancy: Did the categorical waiver to allow the use of power strips described in the  S&C memo 14-46-LSC, issued September 26, 2014 apply to business occupancies? The reader explained that the physician office building where he worked did not have hospital grade receptacles so it did not make sense to him that using UL listed power strips was necessary.

My immediate thought was the CMS issued categorical waiver would only apply to healthcare occupancies because NFPA 99 (2012 edition) does not apply to business occupancies. NFPA 99 is referenced by the healthcare occupancy chapter in section 18.5.1.3 of the 2012 LSC, but it is not referenced by the business occupancy chapters in the same LSC.

But, since I was not sure, I asked the question of a reliable source at CMS and they said the 2012 NFPA 99 Section 3-3.2.1.2(d)2 pertains to the minimum number of receptacles in all Patient Care Rooms.  Patient Care Rooms is defined as any room of a health care facility wherein patients are intended to be examined or treated.  In addition, the 2012 NFPA 99 Section 10.2.3.6 pertains performance criteria and testing for patient-care-related electrical appliances and equipment.  Patient-care-related electrical equipment is defined as electrical equipment that is intended to be used for diagnostic, therapeutic, or monitoring purposes in the patient care vicinity.

As these definitions do not make a differentiation based on occupancy,  it is CMS’s understanding that 2012 NFPA 99 power strip requirements would be applicable in all health care facilities in rooms where patients are intended to be examined or treated regardless of occupancy classification.

So, the answer to the question is the categorical waiver applies to all patient care rooms, regardless of the occupancy classification. This means if you want to use power strips in a physician exam room in a medical office building that is a business occupancy, you need to follow the guidelines in the S&C memo and only use UL listed power strips. However, for other areas of the business occupancy that are not considered patient care rooms, the NFPA 99 requirements concerning UL listed power strips do not apply. But it is wise to purchase only UL listed power strips since you cannot control where they may end up.

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