Dec 13 2012

Fire Drills in Offsite Patient Care Locations

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 6:00 am
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Here is a scenario: A hospital has multiple ‘quick draw’ blood stations scattered across the community in which they are located. These blood draw stations are situated in other occupancies, and strategically located in shopping malls and other high-traffic areas for the convenience of their patients. Hospital staff occupy and manage these blood draw stations, although the actual area is approximately 250 square feet, or the size of an average patient room in a hospital.

The hospital failed to conduct fire drills in these blood draw stations because they did not feel they qualified since they were so small in size. A Joint Commission surveyor discovered the fact that fire drills were not conducted and wrote them up for failure to do fire drills in an offsite business occupancy environment.

I think the finding is valid as the TJC standard EC.02.03.03, EP 2 is very clear: “The hospital conducts fire drills every 12 months from the date of the last drill in all freestanding buildings classified as business occupancies and in which patients are seen or treated.”  The situation described sounds like a business occupancy to me, and the act of drawing blood from a patient is certainly ‘treatment’. So, they got hit from two different angles.

I would agree with the surveyor that a fire drill should have been conducted annually at the draw stations, regardless of their size. It’s one disadvantage for the hospital having their own staff and quick draw station, rather than sub-contracting it out. They also have to do annual emergency response drills at these locations as well, which really doesn’t amount to much at all. In addition, all of the 6 EOC management plans have to apply to these quick draw stations and, the SOC Basic Building Information (BBI) has to list these locations as well. The cost to ‘manage’ the Environment of Care at these offsite locations is extensive, and probably wasn’t considered when they wanted to open them up.  The organization has to manage these locations in a similar way they would manage a clinic.

A fire drill is not an easy proposition at these types of small locations, situated within another building. The Life Safety Code requires the activation of the building’s fire alarm system whenever a fire alarm is conducted. This would have to be coordinated with the building owner.

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