Extra Fire Drills for ILSM

Q: Joint Commission standard LS.01.02.01, EP 11 requires the hospital to perform an additional fire drill during periods of Life Safety Code deficiencies that cannot be immediately corrected or during periods of construction. This standard goes on to say that the need for additional fire drills is based on the criteria in the hospital’s ILSM policy. Let’s suppose that a hospital has deficiencies in the Life Safety Code that lasts only for two, three, four days or maybe even a week. Would the hospital still be required to perform an additional drill for such a short duration of Life Safety Code deficiency? What if the hospital’s Safety Committee decides to state that as part of their ILSM policy criteria, it won’t conduct an additional fire drill per shift per quarter unless the Life Safety Code deficiency lasts beyond a certain amount of time, say maybe a month. It seems to me that a Safety Officer would be on the hook for an additional drill per shift per quarter if ILSMs are only in place for a week is overkill and would serve only to further desensitize staff to its fire alarm system.

A: Joint Commission’s standard LS.01.02.01, EP 11 is not prescriptive, meaning they choose not to specify when the extra fire drill needs to start to compensate for a certain deficiency. They don’t even tell you which deficiency the extra fire drill is even required. That is left up to you to decided and state in your ILSM policy.

I tend to think like you, in that the extra fire drill per shift per quarter does not make sense for a short-term LSC deficiency. But when is a LSC deficiency short-term and when is it considered long term? Perhaps a better approach is to ask: “When will the extra fire drill per shift per quarter be required?” Once you decide when the extra fire drill is required, that should help you decide how soon you need to implement the extra fire drill.

When I was the Safety Officer at the hospital where I worked, I felt the extra fire drill was needed when an exit was obstructed or the access to an exit was obstructed. The reason I believed this, is when you do a fire drill one of the items you are assessing is that staff knows the proper way to evacuate patients (using simulated patients, of course). If the path is obstructed, they need to know the alternative path and be able to demonstrate that. The extra fire drill should assesse the staff’s knowledge on evacuation routes.

Some LSC deficiencies aren’t as obvious so you need to ask yourself “Should I conduct an extra fire drill for this deficiency?” for all of the possible scenarios of LSC deficiency that you could have. Set up a Q&A for all the potential LSC deficiencies that you may encounter at your hospital, then ask yourself is an extra fire drill necessary. Here is an example:

  • Failed fire dampers?                                                   I would say no.
  • Obstructed exit?                                                          I would say yes.
  • Unsealed penetrations in a fire/smoke barrier?          I would say no.
  • Fire alarm pull stations not working?                         I would say yes.
  • Smoke detectors not working?                                  I would say no.
  • Obstructed access to an exit?                                     I would say yes.
  • An inoperative fire pump?                                         I would say no.

Ask yourself: “Would the staff benefit from an extra fire drill if this feature of life safety was not working?” I would say obstructed exits, obstructed access to exits, and inoperative fire alarm pull stations are easy to say ‘yes’ to… but the others? I’m not so sure as I don’t think the staff would benefit from an extra fire drill for an inoperative fire pump, or a failed fire damper. The next question is: “When do I begin the extra fire drills?” Well, if you have defective pull stations or an obstructed exit, you are going to do education and awareness training to the staff affected by these deficiencies. The purpose of the extra fire drill is to assess the staff’s knowledge of these LSC deficiencies after you have conducted the education and training. So, what is reasonable for an obstructed exit? A month after the exit became obstructed? I would say not. Maybe a week after the exit becomes obstructed, but I would say not any more than a week. The sooner the better, as you (the Safety Officer) want to know for sure that the staff knows about the LSC deficiency and takes appropriate alternative action. But this is my opinion, and you need to take this to your Safety Committee and let them offer their suggestions before you finalize your policy. Document this assessment in the form of a matrix, spread sheet or a written narrative in your ILSM policy, and have your Safety Committee review it and approve it. Then the surveyor can only hold you to what your policy says you should do.

Just as a reminder… The extra fire drills for ILSM purposes need to be conducted in the area(s) affected by the LSC deficiency. That means if you have an obstructed exit discharge due to construction, you need to perform the extra fire drills in all areas affected by the deficiency. That may mean you are doing multiple extra fire drills per shift per quarter, until the LSC deficiency is resolved. Also, each fire drill needs to activate the building’s fire alarm system, but during the hours of 9:00 pm and 6:00 am you are not required to activate the audible signals on the fire alarm system.