Exit Discharge Illumination

images3LU8KUQ0I was talking to a hospital facility manager recently and he was miffed that a surveyor cited him for not having emergency power lighting on the exit discharge outside the hospital. He has been at this hospital for nearly 30 years and takes any deficiency as a personal affront to his abilities as a facility manager. Besides, he told me, this has never been a problem before so why is it a problem now? (I hear that a lot!)

Section 7.8.1 of the 2000 Life Safety Code requires the exit discharge to be illuminated all the way to the public way. Sections 18/19.2.9.1 requires emergency lighting in accordance with section 7.9, which requires emergency power for illumination of the exit discharge to the public way. The definition of public way is:

“A street, alley, or other similar parcel of land essentially open to the outside air deeded, dedicated, or otherwise permanently appropriated to the public for public use and having a clear width and height of not less than 10 feet.”

Under most interpretations from the accreditation organizations, the parking lot of a hospital can be considered to meet the requirements of a public way, even though it may not be “deeded to the public”. So, the path of the exit discharge to the parking lot would need to have illumination that is fed from normal power and emergency power. But the illumination for the parking lot would not have to be emergency power illumination, since the requirement is to have emergency power illumination only to the public way, not at the public way. This is a generalized interpretation, and it may or may not apply to all situations. You need to determine before your next survey if your exit discharge lighting meets this requirement.

Also, the illumination source needs to be arranged so the failure of any single lighting unit does not result in an illumination level of less than 0.2 foot-candles. This means you need two-bulb fixtures, or multiple single-bulb fixtures. The issue of LED fixtures is an interesting one. Technically, a LED fixture is comprised of many LED lamps, so I could see a single LED fixture as qualifying as a multiple lamp fixture. I haven’t heard of any authority say anything to the contrary, at least.