Aug 14 2014

Corridor Doors vs. Cross-Corridor Doors

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 6:00 am

Cross Corridor door web 2I have seen many facility managers (and surveyors for that matter) incorrectly refer to a door as a ‘corridor door’. It appears that they believe as long as the door is accessible from the corridor, then it must be a corridor door. That is not always the case, but it is understandable as corridor doors may be confusing.

A corridor door is a door that separates a room from a corridor, and they are usually mounted parallel to the corridor. Corridor doors are often found on entrances to patient rooms, utility rooms, offices, dining rooms, and the like. Corridor doors are often (but not always) a single-leaf door.

A cross-corridor door is a door that separates a corridor from another corridor, and they usually are mounted perpendicular to the corridor. They are typically used as privacy doors, smoke compartment barrier doors, and fire-rated doors in a horizontal exit or an occupancy separation. Cross corridor doors are usually (but not always) double-leaf doors, and if considered new construction, must be double egress, meaning one leaf swings in one direction and the other leaf swings in the opposite direction.

In reviewing accreditation organization survey reports, I have read where surveyors often refer to ‘corridor doors’ when they really mean something else. According to the Life Safety Code, a corridor door is not required to have a self-closing device (closer), unless it also doubles as a door to a hazardous room, a smoke compartment barrier door, or a fire-rated door. Also, a corridor door must latch, while a smoke compartment barrier door does not have to latch. If a door serves more than one purpose, then the most restrictive requirements must apply.

When referring to the many different types of doors that are accessible from the corridors, always refer to them by their most restrictive requirements:

  • Fire-rated doors to hazardous rooms, exit enclosures, horizontal exits, and occupancy separations
  • Smoke compartment barrier doors
  • Corridor doors to hazardous rooms, or non-hazardous rooms
  • Privacy doors

A privacy door that is a cross-corridor door is not required to latch, or be self-closing; but a privacy door that is a corridor door would be required to latch, since the requirements for a corridor door are more restrictive.

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