Aug 28 2014

Comments on Corridor Clutter

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 6:00 am
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Randy Snelling, the Chief Physical Environment Officer, for DNV-GL Healthcare Inc. spoke at the recent ASHE annual conference in Chicago, and I thought his views on corridor clutter were worth repeating here…

“I read in the ASHE magazine recently an article written by a surveyor who listed the top 5 findings he saw during a survey”, says Snelling. “The first thing he identified was corridor clutter. I threw the magazine across the room. I thought, ‘Man, where are we? This is 2014 and we’re still talking about corridor clutter? Really? Come on!’ Why is corridor clutter still happening in hospitals? Because the senior leadership is not stepping in. The facility manager does not have the clout with those clinicians up on the floors where the corridor clutter occurs. But who does? Senior leadership. And if you’ve got corridor clutter problems, it’s not a life safety problem, it’s a ‘C’ suite problem. And our hospitals know it. I don’t think we’ve had a corridor clutter finding in over a year. Now, what happens? Well, we come in and the hospital makes an announcement overhead welcoming the DNV survey team, and everything gets moved out of the corridor. But that happens with everybody else too, with HFAP and TJC and CMS. So why are we seeing this? I think it is because since we are in the hospital every year our hospitals do not have as much to move out of the corridors as other accredited hospitals. This ends up being a problem with Leadership rather than a problem with the facility manager.”

I consider Randy to be a friend and we talk frequently about accreditation issues. I think his view on corridor clutter on the nursing units is spot on, in that senior leadership needs to back the facility manager (or safety officer) on Life Safety Code issues that are out of their capability. Having been a Safety Officer at a hospital for years I can relate to this problem. I rarely felt the support from the ‘C’ suite and felt I had to struggle with certain basic life safety requirements (such as corridor clutter) on my own.

I did eventually take a different approach by spending time on the nursing units observing the nurses day-to-day operations. This made me realize their needs better and they eventually saw me as one who wanted to help, rather than the enemy who was always telling them to move their equipment out of the corridors. I was able to apportion capital funds to build alcoves in certain locations, and they in turn kept the corridor free from clutter.

But most hospitals probably still struggle with corridor clutter issues and without the senior leadership stepping in and backing the facility manager by insisting items be stored in alcoves and storage rooms, this problem will not go away. I predict it will get worse when the 2012 Life Safety Code is finally adopted, since the new LSC allows certain unattended items to be placed in corridors that are at least 8 feet wide. That will create a struggle for everyone as most staff will not understand what pieces are permitted and what pieces are not permitted.

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