CMS Enforces Different Time-Description

I received the following comment from a reader:

During a recent CMS life safety survey a surveyor stated that my kitchen hood suppression testing intervals were out of compliant even though they’re we’re clearly within The Joint Commision’s plus or minus 20 day window for semi-annual testing. He said CMS goes by the NFPA code (not JC) and that, that window is not in the code so therefore the testing must be completed before the 6 month anniversary. However, he stated that the quarterly inspections and testing can be done in a calendar basis and not by the revised quarterly interval parameters that JC has implemented (every 3 months, plus or minus 10 days).

This is an example where the accreditation organization has developed a thoughtful and practical interpretation of the NFPA standards regarding frequency of inspections and tests. Then CMS comes along and denies the practicality of the interpretation because it is not permitted in the NFPA codes or standards. That’s one of the problems with the NFPA standards is they don’t define time, such as what “semi-annual” or “every 6 months” means.

I’ve heard some state agencies surveying on behalf of CMS actually require the annual inspection or testing activity to occur exactly on the same date as the previous activity, one year later. So if it was last tested on April 15, it had to be next tested on April 15 of the next year, regardless what day of the week that landed on. That was extreme and I hope responsible people came to their senses.

But part of the problem is the people who are interpreting these rules have never worked in a hospital. They seem to not understand that hospitals need a reasonable window of opportunity to schedule these inspections and tests. Facility departments have decreasing resources available to them and it would sure be helpful if the government would just give them a little help now and then by interpreting issues with a little kinder attitude.

Wouldn’t it be nice if all of the authorities having jurisdiction (i.e. CMS, accreditation organizations, state fire marshals, etc.) were on the same page for critical issues like this?