Apr 03 2017

Patient Sleeping Room Locks

Category: Door Locks,Patient Rooms,Questions and AnswersBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Q: Are locks permitted on patient room doors? Where can I locate the NFPA requirements for adding new hardware to patient room doors?

A: Section 19.2.2.2.2 of the 2012 Life Safety Code says locks are not permitted on patient sleeping room doors. Then, an exception to this standard says key-locking devices that restrict access to the room from the corridor and that are operable only by staff from the corridor side shall be permitted. Such devices shall not restrict egress from the room. What this means is you can lock the door to a patient sleeping room as long as the person on the inside of the room can open the door and get out.

However, before you think about adding deadbolt locks to existing doors, section 7.2.1.5.10.2 of the same code says you cannot have more than one lock or latch to operate the door. This means a deadbolt lock that is separate from the door latch set is not permitted because it takes two actions to operate the door: 1) Unlock the lock, and; 2) Turn the latch set handle. What you can have is a lock that automatically unlocks the door when the latch set handle is turned. These are also called hotel suite locks, because they are common in hotels. There is a deadbolt that is integrated with the latch set, and a person may unlock the door by simply grasping the latch set handle and turning.

If by chance the door in question is a fire-rated door, according to NFPA 80 you are permitted to make minor changes to the door in order to install new hardware, provided the hardware is listed for use on a fire rated door assembly.


Mar 04 2013

Temporary Storage in Patient Rooms

Q: We have a short-term project where we need to find some space to store equipment until they are installed. The equipment is electronic and needs to remain in their cardboard boxes until it is installed. We think we need to store these items for 6 – 8 weeks. Can we use patient rooms that are not in service as temporary storage areas?

A: Your question is more like “Can we violate the Life Safety Code (LSC) for a short period of time?” In some situations you are permitted to violate the LSC. Section 4.6.10.1 of the 2000 edition of the LSC says you are permitted to occupy the building during construction, repair, alterations, or additions where alternative life safety measures (aka Interim Life Safety Measures), which are acceptable to the authority having jurisdiction, are in place. If the equipment that you wish to store in the out-of-service patient rooms qualifies as construction, repair, alterations or additions, then I would say you have a legitimate position, as long as you implement alternative life safety measures. The measures that you implement should be in accordance with your policies.  However, out-of-service patient rooms cannot be used for storage of combustibles (in this situation, the cardboard boxes would be considered combustible) that is not associated with construction, repair, alteration or additions. The reason is most patient rooms are not constructed to meet the requirements for hazardous storage rooms. Make sure you perform the alternative measures and document each inspection.