Aug 05 2017

Changes to Smoke Barrier Door Testing

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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The following article was published in HCPro’s Hospital Safety Insider, on August 3, 2017:

More than three weeks after a well-publicized compliance deadline passed, CMS announced Friday that the deadline would be pushed back nearly six months, giving facilities until New Year’s Day 2018 to comply with an annual testing requirement for certain doors.

David Wright, director of the CMS Survey and Certification Group, made the announcement in a memo to state survey agency directors. He acknowledged that there had been a fair amount of confusion concerning the change, and he offered some pretty consequential clarifications that could affect whether the new requirement applies to your facility at all.

“[C]onsidering the level of reported misunderstanding of this requirement, CMS has extended the compliance date for this requirement by six months,” Wright wrote.

Within the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA) 2012 Life Safety Code® (LSC), which CMS adopted last year, there is a requirement that fire doors and smoke barrier doors be tested annually. Officials with CMS had taken the position that the new requirement applies to healthcare occupancies; that position, however, was met with pushback.

A petition objecting to the CMS position was discussed at length in June by members of the NFPA Healthcare Interpretations Task Force (HITF), says Brad Keyes, CHSP, owner of Keyes Life Safety Compliance. That petition objected to the notion that the LSC specifically requires annual inspections of smoke barrier doors in healthcare occupancies.

“The HITF members did discuss the issue and agreed that healthcare occupancies were exempt from complying with section 7.2.1.15.2 … because the healthcare occupancies did not specifically require compliance with that section,” Keyes says in an email.

The committee decided to table its decision on the matter to give CMS an opportunity to review its position, as it did, Keyes says.

“I am pleased that the system worked in favor for the many hospitals that are certified by the Federal agency,” he adds.

Although the LSC does include provisions requiring annual inspections of smoke barrier doors and fire doors alike, section 7.2.1.15.1 states that these standards apply only where required by Chapters 11–43. Since the chapters governing healthcare occupancies make no direct reference to Section 7.2.1.15.1, the door inspection provisions do not apply to healthcare occupancies, Wright acknowledged in his memo.

Based on that conclusion, Wright spells out a few key takeaways:

  1. Fire doors. In healthcare occupancies, all fire door assemblies must be inspected and tested annually in healthcare occupancies, based on section 8.3.3.1 of the 2012 LSC, which applies to all occupancies.
  2. Smoke barrier doors. Non-rated doors (including smoke barrier doors and corridor doors to patient care rooms) aren’t subject to the annual inspection and testing requirements, but they “should be routinely inspected as part of the facility maintenance program.”
  3. Deadline. The compliance deadline has been pushed back from July 6, 2017, to January 1, 2018.
  4. Citations. Any LSC deficiencies related to annual fire door inspections should be cited under K211—Means of Egress—General.

But what if a healthcare organization was already cited at some point during the three-week gap between the original compliance date and the clarifying memo (July 6–28) for a failure to conduct an annual test of its smoke doors? Multiple CMS representatives did not respond to requests for an answer. Keyes says CMS has been a stickler in the past, holding that a finding cannot be removed once it is written on a survey report.

“There was an accreditation organization [AO] that used to allow findings to be removed from their survey report if the hospital could demonstrate compliance at the time of the survey,” Keyes says. “CMS has said that the AOs may no longer remove findings, even if the hospital was compliant at the time of the survey.”

The Joint Commission stated in the July edition of Perspectives that it requires annual testing for fire door and smoke door assemblies alike, despite acknowledging that the healthcare occupancy chapters don’t cite section 7.2.1.15 specifically. (To support the requirement, The Joint Commission noted that Section 18/19.2.2.2.1 references section 7.2.1, and cited a belief that the annual tests are beneficial.)

Keyes adds a word of caution: “The AOs are not locked into complying with everything CMS says or does. The AOs may have standards that exceed what CMS requires.”

That means the guidance in Wright’s memo might not trickle down to the AOs and state agencies that conduct surveys at your facilities, especially considering how widely advertised the original compliance date has been.

“So, I suspect many of the AOs will keep the start date at July 5, 2017, since they are already enforcing that,” Keyes says.

With that in mind, he recommends that all healthcare facilities have their fire doors tested as soon as possible, rather than waiting until the new deadline—because another authority having jurisdiction might keep to the stricter timeline.

 

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Aug 01 2017

Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp – September 19 & 20, 2017

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Understand practical applications of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®! Learn from Life Safety surveyors on what to prepare for during surveys! A 2-day Boot Camp on the comprehensive examination of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®, as it applies to healthcare organizations; presented by Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC and Codenity, LLC.

Date: September 19 & 20, 2017

Location: Embassy Suites Hotel – Denver In’t Airport, 7001 Yampa Street, Denver, CO  80249-6411   303-574-3000

Topics:
• LSC Origins & Organization • Smoke Compartments • Occupancy Designations
• Suites • Construction Types • Additions & Renovations
• Operating Features • Means of Egress • Door Locks
• Ambulatory Surgical Centers • Fire Barriers • Hazardous Areas
• Building Services • Fire Protection Systems • Understanding CMS
• Challenges in Implementing the New Requirements of the 2012 LSC • Key Interpretations by Accreditation Organizations • Documentation Needed for a Successful Survey

Who Should Attend:
• Facility Managers • Safety Officers • Chief Operating Officers
• Accreditation Coordinators • Architect/Engineers • Consultants

Presenters:
Brad Keyes, CHSP, owner of Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC; current advisor to Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) and former Joint Commission LS surveyor.

Alise Howlett, Assoc. AIA, CFPE, CHFM, owner of Codenity, LLC; current LS surveyor for HFAP, and a plan reviewer for multiple municipalities.

Cost: $879.00 per participant. Includes workbook, seminar materials, opening night reception, and breakfast and lunch each day; Does not include hotel, or travel. Certificate of Attendance awarded on completion.

For special hotel rates, mention Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp when calling 303-574-3000

Register: Online at www.Eventbrite.com and search “Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp” or go to: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/keyes-life-safety-boot-camp-denver-co-registration-35653000083

Seating is limited to 50 individuals. Registration is not confirmed until payment is received. Registration closes when all seats are filled, or August 25, 2017

Bring your own copy of the 2012 Life Safety Code!

Questions? Call Alise Howlett at 815-713-8144

Exclusively sponsored by:

fire-door-solutions-logo-1-002

 

 

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Jul 25 2017

Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp – September 19 & 20, 2017

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Understand practical applications of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®! Learn from Life Safety surveyors on what to prepare for during surveys! A 2-day Boot Camp on the comprehensive examination of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®, as it applies to healthcare organizations; presented by Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC and Codenity, LLC.

Date: September 19 & 20, 2017

Location: Embassy Suites Hotel – Denver In’t Airport, 7001 Yampa Street, Denver, CO  80249-6411   303-574-3000

Topics:
• LSC Origins & Organization • Smoke Compartments • Occupancy Designations
• Suites • Construction Types • Additions & Renovations
• Operating Features • Means of Egress • Door Locks
• Ambulatory Surgical Centers • Fire Barriers • Hazardous Areas
• Building Services • Fire Protection Systems • Understanding CMS
• Challenges in Implementing the New Requirements of the 2012 LSC • Key Interpretations by Accreditation Organizations • Documentation Needed for a Successful Survey

Who Should Attend:
• Facility Managers • Safety Officers • Chief Operating Officers
• Accreditation Coordinators • Architect/Engineers • Consultants

Presenters:
Brad Keyes, CHSP, owner of Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC; current advisor to Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) and former Joint Commission LS surveyor.

Alise Howlett, Assoc. AIA, CFPE, CHFM, owner of Codenity, LLC; current LS surveyor for HFAP, and a plan reviewer for multiple municipalities.

Cost: $879.00 per participant. Includes workbook, seminar materials, opening night reception, and breakfast and lunch each day; Does not include hotel, or travel. Certificate of Attendance awarded on completion.

For special hotel rates, mention Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp when calling 303-574-3000

Register: Online at www.Eventbrite.com and search “Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp” or go to: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/keyes-life-safety-boot-camp-denver-co-registration-35653000083

Seating is limited to 50 individuals. Registration is not confirmed until payment is received. Registration closes when all seats are filled, or August 25, 2017

Bring your own copy of the 2012 Life Safety Code!

Questions? Call Alise Howlett at 815-713-8144

Exclusively sponsored by:

fire-door-solutions-logo-1-002

 

 

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Jul 22 2017

Follow-Up From an Earlier Post….

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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I recently posted on documentation retention, and how long you should keep test/inspection records. A reader contacted me and said they attended a recent ASHE regional event where the speaker said the CMS K-Tags require some records to be kept for the life of the building, and the reader wanted to know if I was familiar with this requirement.

I said no, I was not, but I decided to get an answer direct from CMS themselves. I did receive a reply from CMS which is considered an informal non-public response, and here is a summary of what they said:

  • CMS has not issued any formal policy on retention of records for LS test/inspections.
  • Surveyors typically look back one (1) year to establish compliance.
  • However, the extent of the record review would consider the frequency of a particular test/inspection requirement.
  • If the test/inspection requirement was a monthly requirement, the surveyor may review 12-months’ worth of documentation to confirm compliance.
  • If the test/inspection requirement was an annual requirement, then the surveyor may review 3-years’ worth of documentation to confirm compliance.
  • In addition, retention of records would consider any NFPA, State, or manufacturer requirements.

It’s important to point out that there is a special requirement in NFPA 99-2012, section 5.1.14.4.1 that does require ‘permanent’ records of certain medical gas tests. Permanent would mean retention for the life of the building (or system), but section 5.1.14.4.1 only refers to initial system verification test records… not routine annual inspections. And it only applies to medical gas and vacuum systems, not other mechanical or electrical systems identified in NFPA 99.

CMS K-Tags 907 and 908 refer to a routine maintenance program and a test/inspection program for medical gas systems. These K-Tags says records are to be maintained as required. Since the K-Tags are a CMS product, they are obviously saying maintenance records and routine test/inspection records are to be kept long enough to establish a pattern of compliance. For annual test/inspection records, that would mean you must retain the records for 3-years, not necessarily for the life of the building.

Similarly, K-Tag 921 discusses a testing and maintenance program for electrical equipment, and it says records are maintained for a period of time to demonstrate compliance. This is consistent with the CMS informal comment that a ‘period of time’ would be 1-year for monthly requirements and 3-years for annual requirements.

Since accreditation organizations operate with the authority granted to them by CMS, it would be expected that the accreditation organizations would comply with the same requirements and informal policies as CMS.

But, I will fallback on what I believe: You should never throw away any records that demonstrate compliance with a regulatory requirement. That’s Brads opinion.

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Jul 18 2017

Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp – September 19 & 20, 2017

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Understand practical applications of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®! Learn from Life Safety surveyors on what to prepare for during surveys! A 2-day Boot Camp on the comprehensive examination of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®, as it applies to healthcare organizations; presented by Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC and Codenity, LLC.

Date: September 19 & 20, 2017

Location: Embassy Suites Hotel – Denver In’t Airport, 7001 Yampa Street, Denver, CO  80249-6411   303-574-3000

Topics:
• LSC Origins & Organization • Smoke Compartments • Occupancy Designations
• Suites • Construction Types • Additions & Renovations
• Operating Features • Means of Egress • Door Locks
• Ambulatory Surgical Centers • Fire Barriers • Hazardous Areas
• Building Services • Fire Protection Systems • Understanding CMS
• Challenges in Implementing the New Requirements of the 2012 LSC • Key Interpretations by Accreditation Organizations • Documentation Needed for a Successful Survey

Who Should Attend:
• Facility Managers • Safety Officers • Chief Operating Officers
• Accreditation Coordinators • Architect/Engineers • Consultants

Presenters:
Brad Keyes, CHSP, owner of Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC; current advisor to Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) and former Joint Commission LS surveyor.

Alise Howlett, Assoc. AIA, CFPE, CHFM, owner of Codenity, LLC; current LS surveyor for HFAP, and a plan reviewer for multiple municipalities.

Cost: $879.00 per participant. Includes workbook, seminar materials, opening night reception, and breakfast and lunch each day; Does not include hotel, or travel. Certificate of Attendance awarded on completion.

For special hotel rates, mention Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp when calling 303-574-3000

Register: Online at www.Eventbrite.com and search “Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp” or go to: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/keyes-life-safety-boot-camp-denver-co-registration-35653000083

Seating is limited to 50 individuals. Registration is not confirmed until payment is received. Registration closes when all seats are filled, or August 25, 2017

Bring your own copy of the 2012 Life Safety Code!

Questions? Call Alise Howlett at 815-713-8144

Exclusively sponsored by:

fire-door-solutions-logo-1-002

 

 

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Jul 11 2017

Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp – September 19 & 20, 2017

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Understand practical applications of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®! Learn from Life Safety surveyors on what to prepare for during surveys! A 2-day Boot Camp on the comprehensive examination of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®, as it applies to healthcare organizations; presented by Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC and Codenity, LLC.

Date: September 19 & 20, 2017

Location: Embassy Suites Hotel – Denver In’t Airport, 7001 Yampa Street, Denver, CO  80249-6411   303-574-3000

Topics:
• LSC Origins & Organization • Smoke Compartments • Occupancy Designations
• Suites • Construction Types • Additions & Renovations
• Operating Features • Means of Egress • Door Locks
• Ambulatory Surgical Centers • Fire Barriers • Hazardous Areas
• Building Services • Fire Protection Systems • Understanding CMS
• Challenges in Implementing the New Requirements of the 2012 LSC • Key Interpretations by Accreditation Organizations • Documentation Needed for a Successful Survey

Who Should Attend:
• Facility Managers • Safety Officers • Chief Operating Officers
• Accreditation Coordinators • Architect/Engineers • Consultants

Presenters:
Brad Keyes, CHSP, owner of Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC; current advisor to Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) and former Joint Commission LS surveyor.

Alise Howlett, Assoc. AIA, CFPE, CHFM, owner of Codenity, LLC; current LS surveyor for HFAP, and a plan reviewer for multiple municipalities.

Cost: $879.00 per participant. Includes workbook, seminar materials, opening night reception, and breakfast and lunch each day; Does not include hotel, or travel. Certificate of Attendance awarded on completion.

For special hotel rates, mention Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp when calling 303-574-3000

Register: Online at www.Eventbrite.com and search “Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp” or go to: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/keyes-life-safety-boot-camp-denver-co-registration-35653000083

Seating is limited to 50 individuals. Registration is not confirmed until payment is received. Registration closes when all seats are filled, or August 25, 2017

Bring your own copy of the 2012 Life Safety Code!

Questions? Call Alise Howlett at 815-713-8144

Exclusively sponsored by:

fire-door-solutions-logo-1-002

 

 

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Jul 04 2017

Not An Ordinary Joe…

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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In your career, you will meet lots of interesting people. If you’re fortunate in life, some of those people will be a blessing to you. That is the case for me with Joe Berlesky.

The first time I met Joe was in 2013 when he answered an advertisement I had placed in the ASHE Career Flash, looking for Life Safety surveyors for HFAP, a hospital accreditation organization. After the initial conversation with him, I knew right away that this guy knew what he was talking about. Life Safety compliance in healthcare organizations is often-times complicated and full of interpretations made by various authorities. Joe seemed to know all the right answers and I hired him as a part-time Life Safety surveyor.

Joe really took to surveying, because the core of surveying is all about helping and teaching other people. Joe destroyed the myth that surveyors have no-heart, and are only interested in enforcing the standards. On the contrary, he spent all his available time teaching and educating the facility managers on how they can improve their regulating process. After all, Joe had been there and done that for decades in the healthcare business.

Then, in the fall of 2015, Joe called me and told me that he needed to take a leave of absence to fight Multiple Myeloma. Multiple Myeloma is a cancer formed by malignant plasma cells. It is considered to be a rare cancer as fewer than 200,000 cases per year are diagnosed.

Sad to say, Joe passed away in May, 2017, but it would be incorrect to say that Joe lost his battle to Multiple Myeloma. Joe never lost that fight… on the contrary, Joe won every day by showing his friends and family how to continue to live, serve others, and be a blessing. Joe would call me or email me and ask me to send him research work. As he put it, he was just ‘sitting around’ doing nothing and he could be researching answers to the frequent questions I get asked.

Joe lived in Florida, and I went down there to visit him in the fall of 2016. At that point, Joe had been ill for about a year, and while he looked tired, his spirit was strong. He said all the right things like he was going to fight this disease and beat it, but I got the sense that beating Multiple Myeloma wasn’t the primary goal for Joe. Living his life in such a way that he could be blessing to others and helping people was Joe’s primary purpose in life. And he succeeded in that up until the day he passed.

Some of you knew Joe, as he was very active in ASHE in New Jersey, and later in Florida. Anyone who knew Joe would agree: He was a huge man, in every sense of the word. What a wonderful blessing he was to me and others. He was not an ordinary Joe.

+++++++++++
Joe’s family is asking that any donations in his honor be made to the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation 383 Main Avenue, 5th Floor Norwalk, CT 06851.
Checks should be made out to the Multiple Myeloma Research Foundation, or online donations can be made at:


Jul 01 2017

Clarification on Emergency Department Occupancy Classification

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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If you’ve been reading my blog postings over the past few months ( see http://keyeslifesafety.com/?s=emergency+department), you’ve read were I have reported that CMS has issued informal, non-public letters to the accreditation organizations (AOs) regarding the occupancy classification of emergency departments. To review how this issue started, CMS issued a letter to one of the AOs last fall (in 2016) regarding the occupancy classification of Emergency Departments. In this letter, CMS said Emergency Departments needed to be classified as healthcare occupancies. This information was then shared to the other AOs.

This set-off quite a stir in the healthcare community, as many people and organizations objected to this strict interpretation, since the 2012 Life Safety Code actually permits Emergency Departments to be classified as ambulatory healthcare occupancies.  Many free-standing Emergency Departments have already been constructed to meet ambulatory healthcare occupancy requirements, and to make physical changes after the facility has been occupied would be an unreasonable hardship.

Apparently, the objections to this rather strict interpretation have been heard, and CMS has again issued an informal, non-public communication that says they have not issued any policy regarding Emergency Department classification. Therefore, according to CMS, occupancy classification of Emergency Departments would be determined in accordance with 2012 Life Safety Code.

This means according to 3.3.188.1, an Emergency Department may be classified as an ambulatory healthcare occupancy provided it does not have sleeping accommodations for 4 or more patients on a 24-hour basis. CMS considers a bed used for 24-hour observation to be ‘sleeping accommodations’ and if the Emergency Department has 4 or more observation beds, then the Emergency Department must be classified as a healthcare occupancy.

Also, another item to consider… If you have an Emergency Department that is considered a suite and is required to be classified as a healthcare occupancy due to ‘sleeping accommodation’ rooms, then the Emergency Department would have to meet the requirements of section 19.2.5.7.2 “Sleeping Suites”. This means, where you previously may have enjoyed a suite that is up to 10,000 square feet in size, you may now be limited to just 5,000 square feet. However, take a look at section 19.2.5.7.2.3 as you may qualify to meet the requirements to bump the suite size up to 7,500 square feet or perhaps even to 10,000 square feet.

This clarification from CMS is helpful, and should go a long way to explain the occupancy classification of Emergency Departments.

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Jun 30 2017

Fire Drill Response

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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A recent question by a reader asked if fire-rated doors and smoke compartment barrier doors that close on a fire alarm could be opened before the fire alarm is considered ‘all clear’. The Life Safety Code (LSC) does address certain key actions required by staff during a fire drill, but it does not specifically restrict the use of doors in fire or smoke compartment barriers while the fire alarm is activated. Section 18/19.7.1.1 of the 2012 LSC requires the healthcare occupancy to have a written plan for the protection of all persons in the event of a fire; for the evacuation to areas of refuge; and for the evacuation of the building when necessary.

Section 4.7 of the same codes also makes similar statements regarding orderly evacuation during a fire drill. It makes sense that opening and closing doors in a fire or smoke compartment barrier would be necessary in order to evacuate patients to another smoke compartment, or to evacuate the building. It also makes sense that responding emergency personnel (both internal and external) would have to open and close doors in order to assist with the evacuation or address the fire.

But perhaps what the reader was referring to is the action of the people who are not responding to the fire alarm, and they are going about their regular activity. Doctors, nurses, technicians, visitors, volunteers, vendors, and others may be ignoring the fire alarm and just continue to walk through doors to other parts of the building. These may be the people who the reader was referring to that are opening and closing fire and smoke compartment barriers doors during a fire alarm.

The Joint Commission standard EC.02.03.03, EP 4 says staff who work in buildings where patients are housed or treated participate in drills according to the hospital’s fire response plan. This is a little bit more than is required by section 18/19.7.1.2 of the 2012 LSC, which says employees of healthcare occupancies shall be instructed in life safety procedures and devices. A fire drill is certainly one method of instruction in life safety procedures and devices. But neither the Joint Commission standard (and EP) and the LSC reference actually requires all staff to participate in every fire drill. It just wouldn’t be practical in a healthcare facility that is providing treatment and care to patients. Business must continue even during a fire alarm, so some staff must continue with their assigned responsibilities.

Therefore, hospitals get to decide for themselves how their staff should react during a fire alarm, as stipulated in their fire response plan (also known as the Fire Safety Management Plan). Most hospitals that I have had the pleasure of working with require staff in the immediate area of the fire emergency respond by following R.A.C.E. (Rescue; Alarm; Contain; and Evacuate or Extinguish) and staff away from the origin of the alarm simply close doors and be ready to receive patients. Some hospitals have staff away from the origin of the alarm to dispatch one individual with a fire extinguisher to the scene of the alarm.

You can write into your plan what you want your staff to do. If you want them to stop at each closed door and not traverse through it until the ‘all-clear’ is given, that is your decision, but I don’t think that is a very practical idea, or one that would be followed. When a fire alarm is activated, it represents a potential disaster and even though it may seem that an ‘all-hands-on-deck’ call is needed, that is not the practical thing to do as a first response. If your facility has 1200 workers on the average day shift, and the fire alarm is activated in the 4th floor ICU, you do not want all 1200 workers to rush up to the 4th floor ICU; that is not practical.

The concept of fire response in a healthcare occupancy is all healthcare workers are trained in the facility’s fire response plan. You count on the staff in the immediate vicinity of the fire to respond appropriately and quickly. Once the alarm is announced, certain trained individuals rush to the area where the alarm originates. The rest of the staff is supposed to reply in accordance with your fire response plan. Quite honestly, unless the staff has specific duties during a fire alarm, moving about the hospital performing their normal duties in areas away from the alarm would be considered appropriate. You actually need the hospital to continue to function even during a fire drill. Each fire drill will not asses every staff member’s response; it just is not practical in such a large setting. That is one reason why there are so many fire drills in a hospital each year: By sheer quantity you hope to get nearly all of the staff to participate in at least one drill.

Another issue is physicians. What should they do during a fire alarm? Many hospitals are writing into their fire response plan that physicians on a nursing unit that are not actively providing care or treatment to a patient, should report to the nurse’s station and await direction. In a Surgery department, unless the operating room is the scene of the fire, you pretty much want surgeons and nurses to remain in the operating rooms and continue with the business at hand, and wait for further instructions from the surgery nurse’s station.

I don’t know if I’ve helped the reader with his question, but if it were me, I would let people do what they normally do, unless they have specific responsibilities during a fire alarm. If the reader is really concerned about certain fire or smoke compartment barrier doors being opened in close proximity to a fire, then it would be practical to station one person at the door preventing unauthorized individuals from opening that door.

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Jun 27 2017

Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp – September 19 & 20, 2017

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Understand practical applications of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®! Learn from Life Safety surveyors on what to prepare for during surveys! A 2-day Boot Camp on the comprehensive examination of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®, as it applies to healthcare organizations; presented by Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC and Codenity, LLC.

Date: September 19 & 20, 2017

Location: Embassy Suites Hotel – Denver In’t Airport, 7001 Yampa Street, Denver, CO  80249-6411   303-574-3000

Topics:
• LSC Origins & Organization • Smoke Compartments • Occupancy Designations
• Suites • Construction Types • Additions & Renovations
• Operating Features • Means of Egress • Door Locks
• Ambulatory Surgical Centers • Fire Barriers • Hazardous Areas
• Building Services • Fire Protection Systems • Understanding CMS
• Challenges in Implementing the New Requirements of the 2012 LSC • Key Interpretations by Accreditation Organizations • Documentation Needed for a Successful Survey

Who Should Attend:
• Facility Managers • Safety Officers • Chief Operating Officers
• Accreditation Coordinators • Architect/Engineers • Consultants

Presenters:
Brad Keyes, CHSP, owner of Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC; current advisor to Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) and former Joint Commission LS surveyor.

Alise Howlett, Assoc. AIA, CFPE, CHFM, owner of Codenity, LLC; current LS surveyor for HFAP, and a plan reviewer for multiple municipalities.

Cost: $879.00 per participant. Includes workbook, seminar materials, opening night reception, and breakfast and lunch each day; Does not include hotel, or travel. Certificate of Attendance awarded on completion.

For special hotel rates, mention Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp when calling 303-574-3000

Register: Online at www.Eventbrite.com and search “Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp” or go to: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/keyes-life-safety-boot-camp-denver-co-registration-35653000083

Seating is limited to 50 individuals. Registration is not confirmed until payment is received. Registration closes when all seats are filled, or August 25, 2017

Bring your own copy of the 2012 Life Safety Code!

Questions? Call Alise Howlett at 815-713-8144

Exclusively sponsored by:

fire-door-solutions-logo-1-002

 

 

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