Oct 06 2017

Contractors During a Survey

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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In preparation for a survey hospitals frequently train their staff to only answer the questions of the surveyors without providing any more information. This has proven to be good advice over the years because many deficiencies are discovered by surveyors based on information provided by the staff after they have answered the surveyor’s questions.

An example of this may be when a surveyor asks a hospital worker what they would do in the event of a fire, and the worker correctly replies by describing the actions suggested by the acronym RACE – Rescue, Alarm, Confine, and Extinguish (or Evacuate). But when the surveyor simply does not respond and the awkward silence builds, the hospital worker gets a bit nervous and continues to speak, eventually revealing some errant activity that is not part of the fire safety plan. That often opens the door for disaster.

Nowhere is this more dangerous than when surveyors are permitted to talk with contractors in the hospital. It has always been my belief that as the survey team walks in the front door of the hospital on the first day of the survey all of the contractors should be walking out the back door. For the most part (and I do understand that there are exceptions), contractors should be sent away once you know there are surveyors in the house. Why? Because they will get you in trouble one way or another.

I recently received an email from a reader who shared this story:

During our triennial survey the life safety surveyor asked me how we knew that the fire alarm system signal was received by our monitoring company. I could not immediately answer the question, but we were lucky to have the service contractor in the building doing his quarterly testing and I suggested we ask him.

 The service technician explained that the software in the fire alarm control system will indicate if the alarm is received by the monitoring company within the designated amount of time. I was quite happy with the service technician’s explanation until the surveyor said “Prove that it happened at least quarterly for the past 12 months”. [This was back when the signal was required to be tested quarterly… today it is only required to be tested annually.]

 The service technician said nobody could prove it; we just have to take his word for it. [Wrong answer.] The surveyor asked “Don’t you call them by telephone to confirm they received the signal?” The service technician replied, saying “Well, would you trust me if I said I did call?”

The surveyor was correct to ask the questions that he/she did. The service technician was probably answering them to the best of his ability, but the real problem is the facility manager allowed the surveyor to enter into a conversation with a contractor. During a survey, the hospital staff should try and control the process as much as possible. By allowing a surveyor to ask questions of a contractor, the facility manager lost control of the situation and will suffer any consequences of what a contractor may say.

Contractors are not trained and educated in the regulatory requirements the same way the hospital staff are (or should be). The contractors may not even know or understand the significance of an accreditation survey, or even a CMS certification survey. Service technicians have a tendency to take an attitude that they know more about the system they are working on than the hospital does, and for the most part they do; otherwise, the hospital would not hire them. But the service technician may not know what specific regulations that the hospital must comply with and therefore may say something to a surveyor that may get you in trouble.

I’m not saying you should not be transparent in your processes, but during a survey, you need to control as much as you can of the survey process. This is not unethical or wrong; it is just smart business. Let the surveyor go where he/she wants; let the surveyor ask questions all they want; but eliminate the potential “loose cannons” that are not very well educated on the survey process by sending them home during the survey.

Another reader sent me an email earlier this year explaining that on a day during the accreditation survey a roofing contractor set a pallet of roofing material right in the middle of the exit discharge of a staff entrance/exit to the hospital. Nobody from the hospital was aware that the roofing contractor was about to do that, but the surveyor noticed it as soon as it happened and it went into the survey deficiency report.

When I was a surveyor for The Joint Commission, I would purposely seek out contractors and ask them what training the hospital provided them on fire safety procedures. Ultimately, contractors are expected to know the same fire response procedures as the staff. Invariably they could not answer the question satisfactory and it would be cited in the survey deficiency report.

I know that in some situations you cannot send the contractors home for the duration of the survey, but it seems that a large percentage of them could. At the hospital where I worked as the Safety Officer, I asked the project management team to send the contractors away during the week of the survey (this was when the surveys were announced). The project managers thought that was a good idea, but we were over-ruled by the COO of the hospital, because he did not want the opening of the new renovated unit to be delayed. That ended up being a costly mistake.

The hospital had a policy that every contractor had to receive basic safety orientation before they begin their work on the campus of the organization. Unbeknownst to the hospital, the general contractor brought in a sub-contractor to install flooring in one area, and they did not go through the safety training because the general thought it would be “okay” since the sub was only going to be there for one day. Sure enough, the surveyor found that one sub who had not received the safety training which led to a finding on the survey deficiency report.

You need to control what you can, and sending the contractors away is the smart thing to do during a survey.

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Oct 03 2017

Your Help and Understanding is Appreciated….

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Hello readers…

If you are not already aware of this, I am a one-person organization. I do have a partner (Alise Howlett, of Codenity) when I do boot camps, but the website is all my own and I answer every question submitted, myself.

As you know, I do not charge for the Q&A service nor do I charge for the use of the reference information in this website. This is my way of paying back to the industry that I love and helping others along the way. It is also my only marketing approach for my consultation business.

The problem is, when I get real busy with consulting work, I do not always have the time to answer reader’s questions. Since answering your questions is a free service that I offer, I don’t apologize for taking the time to reply to your questions. For example; right now, I have a backlog of questions that are unanswered that date back to August 23 of this year.

I will eventually get around to answering your question, but your understanding is appreciated if I don’t answer right away.

Here are some suggestions that you can do to make the Q&A process a little easier for all of us:

  • Please use punctuation when you write your questions. At times, I receive a question that has run-on sentences without any punctuation, and it makes it difficult to understand what the reader is asking.
  • Please take the time to proof-read your question. I know everyone is busy and time is precious, but if you just read what you wrote before you send it, perhaps you will catch some typographical errors that could make it easier for me to understand what you’re asking.
  • Please understand that I only take healthcare questions related to the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code, 2012 edition, and related referenced standards. I do not answer questions regarding the International Building Code, your state’s regulatory requirements, Infection Control related questions, nor do I speak on behalf of any of the accreditation organizations (AO). While I may have knowledge on certain issues that the AOs may have, I cannot provide official interpretations that they may have. (Please feel free to contact your AO directly with questions).
  • Please make sure your email address is correct. At times, when I reply to a question, I receive a bounce-back reply that the email address provided to me is invalid, or the inbox is full and will not receive any new emails. There is nothing I can do about this, if your email address does not receive my reply.
  • Please… when you are referencing a code or standard, please provide the code or standard number and the edition that you are referencing. This makes a huge difference in my ability to understand what you’re asking.
  • Please do not use abbreviations without first writing out the full description first. I’ve received questions with abbreviations that I do not know or understand, and have to write back asking the reader what it means. This only slows the process down.

You’re cooperation and understanding when you ask questions is greatly appreciated.


Sep 05 2017

Power Assist Door

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Q: We were cited during a recent survey for not having our power assist doors to our ICU suite connected to the fire alarm system. I thought that was only required on fire-rated doors. Is this a requirement for a corridor door?

A: Section 7.2.1.9 of the 2012 Life Safety Code is discussing Powered Door Leaf Operation, and applies to power assist and power operated doors. This section is not limited to any type of door, such as fire-rated, smoke-resistant, etc. This section applies to all doors with power assist and/or power operated. The six criterions listed under 7.2.1.9.2 must all be met in order to comply with 7.2.1.9.2. Subsection (4) under 7.2.1.9.2 discusses the situation where the door leaf is required to be self-closing or positive latching and is equipped with power operation and is left in an open position, there must a smoke detector near the door that would activate and cause the door leaf to close and cease operation. Therefore, the power assist function would have to be connected to the fire alarm system. Subsection (4) says the smoke detector must be placed in accordance with NFPA 72, so there are a couple of options:

  1. A smoke detector within 5 feet on one side of the door if the height of the transom above the door is less than 24 inches.
  2. A smoke detector within 5 feet on both side of the door if the height of the transom is 24 or more inches above the door.
  3. A smoke detector within 14 feet of the door if the entire area on that side of the door (i.e. corridor) is 100% smoke detected.

All of the above applies to any door, regardless of fire-rating, that is required to be either self-closing or positive latching and is equipped with power assist or power operated equipment. Yes… it applies to suite entrance doors, because the suite is a room that is separated from the corridor and according to 19.3.6.3.3, corridor doors must latch.

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Aug 22 2017

Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp – Last Chance To Register!

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Understand practical applications of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®! Learn from Life Safety surveyors on what to prepare for during surveys! A 2-day Boot Camp on the comprehensive examination of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®, as it applies to healthcare organizations; presented by Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC and Codenity, LLC.

Date: September 19 & 20, 2017

Location: Embassy Suites Hotel – Denver In’t Airport, 7001 Yampa Street, Denver, CO  80249-6411   303-574-3000

Topics:
• LSC Origins & Organization • Smoke Compartments • Occupancy Designations
• Suites • Construction Types • Additions & Renovations
• Operating Features • Means of Egress • Door Locks
• Ambulatory Surgical Centers • Fire Barriers • Hazardous Areas
• Building Services • Fire Protection Systems • Understanding CMS
• Challenges in Implementing the New Requirements of the 2012 LSC • Key Interpretations by Accreditation Organizations • Documentation Needed for a Successful Survey

Who Should Attend:
• Facility Managers • Safety Officers • Chief Operating Officers
• Accreditation Coordinators • Architect/Engineers • Consultants

Presenters:
Brad Keyes, CHSP, owner of Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC; current advisor to Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) and former Joint Commission LS surveyor.

Alise Howlett, Assoc. AIA, CFPE, CHFM, owner of Codenity, LLC; current LS surveyor for HFAP, and a plan reviewer for multiple municipalities.

Cost: $879.00 per participant. Includes workbook, seminar materials, opening night reception, and breakfast and lunch each day; Does not include hotel, or travel. Certificate of Attendance awarded on completion.

For special hotel rates, mention Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp when calling 303-574-3000

Register: Online at www.Eventbrite.com and search “Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp” or go to: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/keyes-life-safety-boot-camp-denver-co-registration-35653000083

Seating is limited to 50 individuals. Registration is not confirmed until payment is received. Registration closes when all seats are filled, or August 25, 2017

Bring your own copy of the 2012 Life Safety Code!

Questions? Call Alise Howlett at 815-713-8144

Exclusively sponsored by:

fire-door-solutions-logo-1-002

 

 

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Aug 19 2017

Please Vote for Michael Crowley

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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ASHE MEMBERS

Please Vote for Michael Crowley for ASHE Associate Member Director.

Michael (Mike) Crowley has been an active associate member of ASHE for over 20 years, many of which he spent on the exhibit floor representing his company. ASHE fills a great mission in the healthcare field and helps shape the future of health care design, safety, and regulations. Being nominated to run for associate member representative is an honor and Mike believes he can contribute to ASHE’s overall mission while fairly representing his fellow associate members.

Mike is also active in the NFPA code writing process as a technical committee member. He believes sharing updates to NFPA 101, and NFPA 99 at PDC and ASHE annual is very important. Educating the users and the enforcers on Code updates and intention behind the Code develops a common understanding.

ASHE Advocacy is making a major impact on harmonizing NFPA 101 and the International Building Code (IBC). Mike believes there are too many Code and interpretations, highlighting a need for Common requirements. Mike’s focus will be on the education and understanding the impact of the Codes on the day-to-day operations in healthcare facilities.

Fire Protection and Life Safety are important to the operations and accreditation of facilities. Mike’s presence on the Board of Directors will bring his experience in the Code writing process, Life Safety expertise, and a focus on sharing the knowledge, to the ASHE membership.

Mike is looking forward to being the Associate Member representative for the Board of Directors for ASHE. Please vote for Michael Crowley for Associate Member Director.

VOTE for ASHE Board of Directors

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Aug 15 2017

Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp – September 19 & 20, 2017

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Understand practical applications of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®! Learn from Life Safety surveyors on what to prepare for during surveys! A 2-day Boot Camp on the comprehensive examination of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®, as it applies to healthcare organizations; presented by Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC and Codenity, LLC.

Date: September 19 & 20, 2017

Location: Embassy Suites Hotel – Denver In’t Airport, 7001 Yampa Street, Denver, CO  80249-6411   303-574-3000

Topics:
• LSC Origins & Organization • Smoke Compartments • Occupancy Designations
• Suites • Construction Types • Additions & Renovations
• Operating Features • Means of Egress • Door Locks
• Ambulatory Surgical Centers • Fire Barriers • Hazardous Areas
• Building Services • Fire Protection Systems • Understanding CMS
• Challenges in Implementing the New Requirements of the 2012 LSC • Key Interpretations by Accreditation Organizations • Documentation Needed for a Successful Survey

Who Should Attend:
• Facility Managers • Safety Officers • Chief Operating Officers
• Accreditation Coordinators • Architect/Engineers • Consultants

Presenters:
Brad Keyes, CHSP, owner of Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC; current advisor to Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) and former Joint Commission LS surveyor.

Alise Howlett, Assoc. AIA, CFPE, CHFM, owner of Codenity, LLC; current LS surveyor for HFAP, and a plan reviewer for multiple municipalities.

Cost: $879.00 per participant. Includes workbook, seminar materials, opening night reception, and breakfast and lunch each day; Does not include hotel, or travel. Certificate of Attendance awarded on completion.

For special hotel rates, mention Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp when calling 303-574-3000

Register: Online at www.Eventbrite.com and search “Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp” or go to: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/keyes-life-safety-boot-camp-denver-co-registration-35653000083

Seating is limited to 50 individuals. Registration is not confirmed until payment is received. Registration closes when all seats are filled, or August 25, 2017

Bring your own copy of the 2012 Life Safety Code!

Questions? Call Alise Howlett at 815-713-8144

Exclusively sponsored by:

fire-door-solutions-logo-1-002

 

 

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Aug 08 2017

Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp – September 19 & 20, 2017

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Understand practical applications of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®! Learn from Life Safety surveyors on what to prepare for during surveys! A 2-day Boot Camp on the comprehensive examination of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®, as it applies to healthcare organizations; presented by Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC and Codenity, LLC.

Date: September 19 & 20, 2017

Location: Embassy Suites Hotel – Denver In’t Airport, 7001 Yampa Street, Denver, CO  80249-6411   303-574-3000

Topics:
• LSC Origins & Organization • Smoke Compartments • Occupancy Designations
• Suites • Construction Types • Additions & Renovations
• Operating Features • Means of Egress • Door Locks
• Ambulatory Surgical Centers • Fire Barriers • Hazardous Areas
• Building Services • Fire Protection Systems • Understanding CMS
• Challenges in Implementing the New Requirements of the 2012 LSC • Key Interpretations by Accreditation Organizations • Documentation Needed for a Successful Survey

Who Should Attend:
• Facility Managers • Safety Officers • Chief Operating Officers
• Accreditation Coordinators • Architect/Engineers • Consultants

Presenters:
Brad Keyes, CHSP, owner of Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC; current advisor to Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) and former Joint Commission LS surveyor.

Alise Howlett, Assoc. AIA, CFPE, CHFM, owner of Codenity, LLC; current LS surveyor for HFAP, and a plan reviewer for multiple municipalities.

Cost: $879.00 per participant. Includes workbook, seminar materials, opening night reception, and breakfast and lunch each day; Does not include hotel, or travel. Certificate of Attendance awarded on completion.

For special hotel rates, mention Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp when calling 303-574-3000

Register: Online at www.Eventbrite.com and search “Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp” or go to: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/keyes-life-safety-boot-camp-denver-co-registration-35653000083

Seating is limited to 50 individuals. Registration is not confirmed until payment is received. Registration closes when all seats are filled, or August 25, 2017

Bring your own copy of the 2012 Life Safety Code!

Questions? Call Alise Howlett at 815-713-8144

Exclusively sponsored by:

fire-door-solutions-logo-1-002

 

 

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Aug 05 2017

Changes to Smoke Barrier Door Testing

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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The following article was published in HCPro’s Hospital Safety Insider, on August 3, 2017:

More than three weeks after a well-publicized compliance deadline passed, CMS announced Friday that the deadline would be pushed back nearly six months, giving facilities until New Year’s Day 2018 to comply with an annual testing requirement for certain doors.

David Wright, director of the CMS Survey and Certification Group, made the announcement in a memo to state survey agency directors. He acknowledged that there had been a fair amount of confusion concerning the change, and he offered some pretty consequential clarifications that could affect whether the new requirement applies to your facility at all.

“[C]onsidering the level of reported misunderstanding of this requirement, CMS has extended the compliance date for this requirement by six months,” Wright wrote.

Within the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA) 2012 Life Safety Code® (LSC), which CMS adopted last year, there is a requirement that fire doors and smoke barrier doors be tested annually. Officials with CMS had taken the position that the new requirement applies to healthcare occupancies; that position, however, was met with pushback.

A petition objecting to the CMS position was discussed at length in June by members of the NFPA Healthcare Interpretations Task Force (HITF), says Brad Keyes, CHSP, owner of Keyes Life Safety Compliance. That petition objected to the notion that the LSC specifically requires annual inspections of smoke barrier doors in healthcare occupancies.

“The HITF members did discuss the issue and agreed that healthcare occupancies were exempt from complying with section 7.2.1.15.2 … because the healthcare occupancies did not specifically require compliance with that section,” Keyes says in an email.

The committee decided to table its decision on the matter to give CMS an opportunity to review its position, as it did, Keyes says.

“I am pleased that the system worked in favor for the many hospitals that are certified by the Federal agency,” he adds.

Although the LSC does include provisions requiring annual inspections of smoke barrier doors and fire doors alike, section 7.2.1.15.1 states that these standards apply only where required by Chapters 11–43. Since the chapters governing healthcare occupancies make no direct reference to Section 7.2.1.15.1, the door inspection provisions do not apply to healthcare occupancies, Wright acknowledged in his memo.

Based on that conclusion, Wright spells out a few key takeaways:

  1. Fire doors. In healthcare occupancies, all fire door assemblies must be inspected and tested annually in healthcare occupancies, based on section 8.3.3.1 of the 2012 LSC, which applies to all occupancies.
  2. Smoke barrier doors. Non-rated doors (including smoke barrier doors and corridor doors to patient care rooms) aren’t subject to the annual inspection and testing requirements, but they “should be routinely inspected as part of the facility maintenance program.”
  3. Deadline. The compliance deadline has been pushed back from July 6, 2017, to January 1, 2018.
  4. Citations. Any LSC deficiencies related to annual fire door inspections should be cited under K211—Means of Egress—General.

But what if a healthcare organization was already cited at some point during the three-week gap between the original compliance date and the clarifying memo (July 6–28) for a failure to conduct an annual test of its smoke doors? Multiple CMS representatives did not respond to requests for an answer. Keyes says CMS has been a stickler in the past, holding that a finding cannot be removed once it is written on a survey report.

“There was an accreditation organization [AO] that used to allow findings to be removed from their survey report if the hospital could demonstrate compliance at the time of the survey,” Keyes says. “CMS has said that the AOs may no longer remove findings, even if the hospital was compliant at the time of the survey.”

The Joint Commission stated in the July edition of Perspectives that it requires annual testing for fire door and smoke door assemblies alike, despite acknowledging that the healthcare occupancy chapters don’t cite section 7.2.1.15 specifically. (To support the requirement, The Joint Commission noted that Section 18/19.2.2.2.1 references section 7.2.1, and cited a belief that the annual tests are beneficial.)

Keyes adds a word of caution: “The AOs are not locked into complying with everything CMS says or does. The AOs may have standards that exceed what CMS requires.”

That means the guidance in Wright’s memo might not trickle down to the AOs and state agencies that conduct surveys at your facilities, especially considering how widely advertised the original compliance date has been.

“So, I suspect many of the AOs will keep the start date at July 5, 2017, since they are already enforcing that,” Keyes says.

With that in mind, he recommends that all healthcare facilities have their fire doors tested as soon as possible, rather than waiting until the new deadline—because another authority having jurisdiction might keep to the stricter timeline.

 

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Aug 01 2017

Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp – September 19 & 20, 2017

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Understand practical applications of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®! Learn from Life Safety surveyors on what to prepare for during surveys! A 2-day Boot Camp on the comprehensive examination of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®, as it applies to healthcare organizations; presented by Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC and Codenity, LLC.

Date: September 19 & 20, 2017

Location: Embassy Suites Hotel – Denver In’t Airport, 7001 Yampa Street, Denver, CO  80249-6411   303-574-3000

Topics:
• LSC Origins & Organization • Smoke Compartments • Occupancy Designations
• Suites • Construction Types • Additions & Renovations
• Operating Features • Means of Egress • Door Locks
• Ambulatory Surgical Centers • Fire Barriers • Hazardous Areas
• Building Services • Fire Protection Systems • Understanding CMS
• Challenges in Implementing the New Requirements of the 2012 LSC • Key Interpretations by Accreditation Organizations • Documentation Needed for a Successful Survey

Who Should Attend:
• Facility Managers • Safety Officers • Chief Operating Officers
• Accreditation Coordinators • Architect/Engineers • Consultants

Presenters:
Brad Keyes, CHSP, owner of Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC; current advisor to Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) and former Joint Commission LS surveyor.

Alise Howlett, Assoc. AIA, CFPE, CHFM, owner of Codenity, LLC; current LS surveyor for HFAP, and a plan reviewer for multiple municipalities.

Cost: $879.00 per participant. Includes workbook, seminar materials, opening night reception, and breakfast and lunch each day; Does not include hotel, or travel. Certificate of Attendance awarded on completion.

For special hotel rates, mention Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp when calling 303-574-3000

Register: Online at www.Eventbrite.com and search “Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp” or go to: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/keyes-life-safety-boot-camp-denver-co-registration-35653000083

Seating is limited to 50 individuals. Registration is not confirmed until payment is received. Registration closes when all seats are filled, or August 25, 2017

Bring your own copy of the 2012 Life Safety Code!

Questions? Call Alise Howlett at 815-713-8144

Exclusively sponsored by:

fire-door-solutions-logo-1-002

 

 

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Jul 25 2017

Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp – September 19 & 20, 2017

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Understand practical applications of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®! Learn from Life Safety surveyors on what to prepare for during surveys! A 2-day Boot Camp on the comprehensive examination of the NFPA 101 Life Safety Code®, as it applies to healthcare organizations; presented by Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC and Codenity, LLC.

Date: September 19 & 20, 2017

Location: Embassy Suites Hotel – Denver In’t Airport, 7001 Yampa Street, Denver, CO  80249-6411   303-574-3000

Topics:
• LSC Origins & Organization • Smoke Compartments • Occupancy Designations
• Suites • Construction Types • Additions & Renovations
• Operating Features • Means of Egress • Door Locks
• Ambulatory Surgical Centers • Fire Barriers • Hazardous Areas
• Building Services • Fire Protection Systems • Understanding CMS
• Challenges in Implementing the New Requirements of the 2012 LSC • Key Interpretations by Accreditation Organizations • Documentation Needed for a Successful Survey

Who Should Attend:
• Facility Managers • Safety Officers • Chief Operating Officers
• Accreditation Coordinators • Architect/Engineers • Consultants

Presenters:
Brad Keyes, CHSP, owner of Keyes Life Safety Compliance, LLC; current advisor to Healthcare Facilities Accreditation Program (HFAP) and former Joint Commission LS surveyor.

Alise Howlett, Assoc. AIA, CFPE, CHFM, owner of Codenity, LLC; current LS surveyor for HFAP, and a plan reviewer for multiple municipalities.

Cost: $879.00 per participant. Includes workbook, seminar materials, opening night reception, and breakfast and lunch each day; Does not include hotel, or travel. Certificate of Attendance awarded on completion.

For special hotel rates, mention Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp when calling 303-574-3000

Register: Online at www.Eventbrite.com and search “Keyes Life Safety Boot Camp” or go to: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/keyes-life-safety-boot-camp-denver-co-registration-35653000083

Seating is limited to 50 individuals. Registration is not confirmed until payment is received. Registration closes when all seats are filled, or August 25, 2017

Bring your own copy of the 2012 Life Safety Code!

Questions? Call Alise Howlett at 815-713-8144

Exclusively sponsored by:

fire-door-solutions-logo-1-002

 

 

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