Jul 27 2017

AHJ on Fire Door Inspections

Category: Fire Doors,Questions and Answers,TestingBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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Q:  Does the authority having jurisdiction have the final say whether or not an individual has the ‘knowledge and understanding’ required to perform fire door inspections?

A: Yes they do. Take a look at 4.6.1.1 of the 2012 LSC “The authority having jurisdiction shall determine whether the provisions of this Code are met.” That means the AHJ decides if the organization is compliant with the applicable NFPA codes and standards. But, keep in mind the typical hospital has 5 or 6 different AHJs that inspect their facility for compliance with the LSC:

  • CMS
  • Accreditation organization
  • State health department
  • State agency with over-sight on hospital construction
  • State fire marshal
  • Local fire inspector
  • Liability insurance company

Not one AHJ can over-ride another AHJ’s decision. All AHJs are equal… but different. If 5 AHJs say the qualifications of the person performing the fire door inspections are fine, but 1 AHJ says no, then the hospital must comply with the most restrictive requirements and comply with the latter AHJ’s desires. An AHJ may have rules and requirements that exceed NFPA standards, as well they should. NFPA standards are minimal standards, and most hospitals exceed the NFPA standards in some capacity, often due to local ordinances or state regulations (and sometimes at the whim of the design professional). But, if the AHJ decides to have standards that exceed the minimal NFPA requirements, they need to be able to justify that decision.

It is not at all uncommon for a healthcare organization to seek permission from a state or local AHJ (i.e. state fire marshal) to install a particular device or have a particular feature, only to find out later that their accreditation organization does not agree, and cites the issue. Both the state or local AHJ and the accreditation organization are correct; they are interpreting the Life Safety Code as they see fit. Whatever was approved by the state or local AHJ is just an approval for the state or local regulations. What was cited by the accreditation organization was cited based on the accreditation organization’s regulations and understanding of the Life Safety Code.

This is why healthcare organizations need to obtain permission and interpretations from all of their AHJs… not just one or two.