Sep 03 2016

A Reader Speaks Out…

Category: Power Strips,Questions and AnswersBKeyes @ 12:00 am
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A reader has an objection to one of the answers I provided in yesterday’s blog concerning Power Strips…

Brad:

In the Sept. 2, 2016 article on Power Strips the following Q & A appeared.

Question: Can IT electronic health record equipment use an RPT within the patient care vicinity?

Answer: No. “Patient-care-related electrical equipment” is defined as electrical equipment that is intended to be used for diagnostic, therapeutic, or monitoring purposes in the patient care vicinity. IT electronic health record equipment does not meet this definition. Since it is non-patient care related electrical equipment, it is not permitted to be connected to a power strip in the patient care vicinity.

I had asked George Mills from The Joint Commission at the 2015 ASHE Convention if bedside IT electronic health record equipment met the definition of ““Patient-care-related electrical equipment”. He said it did. I agree with this since these units are being used to do things such as display x-rays and act as a gate keeping prior to a patient being given medication. I feel that this equipment is an integral and direct component in patient care. The ability to adjust the workstation permanently mounted next to the bed depends on the wires from the various components (monitor, CPU, barcode reader) being plugged into an RPT and the single wire from the RPT being routed through the workstation and out to a wall outlet.

My question is: Has TJC or CMS placed anything in writing that states that these devices do or do not meet the definition of patient care equipment?

 

A: No… TJC and CMS has not placed anything in writing that’ states these devices do or do not meet the definition of patient care equipment. But, you make a good point.

By your description, the traditional electronic health record equipment is now serving as “monitoring” equipment for patient care. You and George have changed the traditional use of the equipment from just storing and retrieving healthcare records, to a patient care related use. This meets the definition of patient care related electrical equipment and would then be permitted to be used in the patient care vicinity.

I suggest you perform a risk assessment and get that documented so a surveyor in the future will not cite you for that. Because, from the traditional use of the equipment, it does not appear to meet the definition of patient care related electrical equipment.