Nov 06 2014

A Follow-Up to “Comments on Corridor Clutter”

Category: BlogBKeyes @ 6:00 am
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The following comment is a result of an article that I ran last August on corridor clutter (search: Comments on Corridor Clutter), which quoted Randy Snelling, the Chief Physical Environment Officer for DNV.GL Healthcare, Inc. This comment is from a representative from a state agency that performs surveys on behalf of CMS.

First, I totally agree with both Randy and you. Both in principle and standard we should be  more up to date and facilities should know what the standard is and how to  follow it. Oddly, I spend more time assisting facilities on this issue even when I cite it. I tend to smile when they announce I have arrived and wonder “Were you in compliance yesterday?”

As a surveyor doing checks on all occupancies, I have found none ever seem to not have some issue with space and where to place those items needed for patient/resident care. Having worked in a healthcare facility, I can also fully relate that focus being first and foremost.

That being said, the standard is there for a reason and has been for some time.  Even though my initial peek into 2012 finds some increasing awareness of how clutter is viewed, I still believe that we have a wide arrangement of options if, as both you and Randy point out, senior management buys into it and
supports either their Safety Manager or Maintenance staff.

Inevitably, these are the ones who take it very personally when I cite a facility for a blocked or obstructed corridor. Administrators, Chief Nursing Officers on down need to understand the reasoning behind the code and what steps it takes to stay in compliance. I feel a majority of the time the facility management thinks “Oh we clear everything when the drills happen”. Now imagine those corridors filled top to bottom with smoke. The scenario will change considerably. I hope all who read your article and Randy’s comments take it to heart.

I think this representative for a state agency makes a very good point: The healthcare industry needs better education on the need to keep the corridors clear from clutter. I suspect we have become insensitive to this issue because the frequency of fires in hospitals has dropped dramatically since the mid-1980’s, when smoking was restricted in hospitals.

But fires still occur in healthcare settings as documented in either this blog or in the HCPro’s Healthcare Life Safety Compliance newsletter. And it is the belief of Randy and I (and this representative from a state agency) that corridor clutter still needs to be taken seriously.

In my opinion, it did not help that the NFPA Life Safety Code technical committee decided to allow certain unattended items in corridors of 8 feet as described in the 2012 edition. It also didn’t help that CMS decided to endorse this section of the 2012 edition last year as a categorical waiver. The decision on the technical committee to do this was not unanimous, as a representative from a state agency who surveys hospitals (not the same individual quoted above) enthusiastically opposed the decision. Since he had first-hand observation on how hospitals abuse codes and standards, he did not want to allow them to store items in the corridor.

I suspect corridor clutter will remain a problem until senior leadership decides to take an active role in resolving it.

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